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Gender issues in elementary mathematics teaching materials: a comparative study between China and Australia

Wu, Yang, Widjaja, Wanty and Li, Jun 2016, Gender issues in elementary mathematics teaching materials: a comparative study between China and Australia. In Liyanage, Indika and Nima, Badeng (ed), Multidisciplinary research perspectives in education : shared experiences from Australia and China, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, pp.149-160.

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Title Gender issues in elementary mathematics teaching materials: a comparative study between China and Australia
Author(s) Wu, Yang
Widjaja, WantyORCID iD for Widjaja, Wanty orcid.org/0000-0002-7288-6088
Li, JunORCID iD for Li, Jun orcid.org/0000-0002-3246-3670
Title of book Multidisciplinary research perspectives in education : shared experiences from Australia and China
Editor(s) Liyanage, Indika
Nima, Badeng
Publication date 2016
Chapter number 18
Total chapters 24
Start page 149
End page 160
Total pages 12
Publisher Sense Publishers
Place of Publication Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Summary International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) cross-national studies (FIMS, SIMS and TIMSS) show that gender differences in mathematical achievements and attitudes have decreased considerably over thirty years (Hanna, 2000), however, mathematics is still historically stereotyped as a male domain with crucial evidence supporting this belief (Forgasz, Leder, & Kloosterman, 2009). Previous research showed that gender differences in mathematics participation,performance and achievement existed widely in the majority of English speaking countries, specifically favouring boys (Forgasz, 1992; Hyde, Fennema, & Lamon, 1990; Tiedemann, 2000). Hyde, Lindberg, Linn, Ellis and Williams (2008) pointed out that the stereotype that females lack mathematical ability persists and is widely held by parents and teachers.Mathematics teaching materials play an important role in mathematics teaching and learning. The contents within mathematical teaching materials are rational, and deliver both explicit and implicit information. The explicit information refers to mathematics knowledge that students can learn from textbooks, while the latter one, also named as hidden curriculum, contains social and cultural messages. Hidden curriculum is a side effect of education. It has deep and long-term influences on students’ construction of math-gender stereotype that impact their future mathematicallearning (Zhang & Zhou, 2008). Therefore, this study will investigate Chinese andAustralian elementary mathematics teaching materials to explore the messages of gender equity and inequity delivered through hidden curriculum including names, images and problem-solving contexts. Based on the findings, practical implications concerning the promotion of equitable gender environments within elementary mathematics teaching materials from a cross-cultural perspective will be discussed.
ISBN 9789463006132
Language eng
Field of Research 130208 Mathematics and Numeracy Curriculum and Pedagogy
130302 Comparative and Cross-Cultural Education
Socio Economic Objective 930102 Learner and Learning Processes
HERDC Research category B1 Book chapter
ERA Research output type B Book chapter
Copyright notice ©2016, Sense Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084773

Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: School of Education
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