You are not logged in.

Movement patterns of Sanderling (Calidris alba) in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway and a comparison of methods for identification of crucial areas for conservation

Lisovski, Simeon, Gosbell, Ken, Christie, Maureen, Hoye, Bethany, Klaassen, Marcel, Stewart, Iain D., Taysom, Alice J. and Minton, Clive 2016, Movement patterns of Sanderling (Calidris alba) in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway and a comparison of methods for identification of crucial areas for conservation, Emu: austral ornithology, vol. 116, no. 2, pp. 168-177, doi: 10.1071/MU15042.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Movement patterns of Sanderling (Calidris alba) in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway and a comparison of methods for identification of crucial areas for conservation
Author(s) Lisovski, Simeon
Gosbell, Ken
Christie, Maureen
Hoye, BethanyORCID iD for Hoye, Bethany orcid.org/0000-0001-9502-5582
Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Stewart, Iain D.
Taysom, Alice J.
Minton, Clive
Journal name Emu: austral ornithology
Volume number 116
Issue number 2
Start page 168
End page 177
Total pages 10
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Clayton, Vic
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1448-5540
Keyword(s) banding data
bird counts
bird migration
conservation planning
light-level geolocation
MCMC path estimation
migratory connectivity
resightings
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Ornithology
Zoology
bird counts
bird migration
light-level geolocation
Summary Worldwide, most populations of migratory shorebirds are in jeopardy, none more so than those of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF). In order to preserve these highly mobile species a detailed understanding of their use of feeding and resting sites along the flyway is required. In this study we used light-level geolocators and new analytical tools to reveal individual breeding locations and migration routes of 13 Sanderlings (Calidris alba) that spend their non-breeding season in South Australia. We then used these individual migration routes to identify the timing and location of important stopping areas and compared this with assessments based on resightings of leg-flagged birds and count data. During both northward and southward migration, Sanderlings were found to make extensive use of five main areas of the Chinese coastline, the Yellow Sea and the northern end of the Sakhalin Peninsula. Insights gained from the individual migration routes highlight inherent biases in using only count and resighting data to identify important feeding and resting sites along the Flyway. These findings suggest that data on individual movements may be crucial to effective conservation planning of shorebirds in the EAAF and elsewhere in the world.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/MU15042
Field of Research 060299 Ecology not elsewhere classified
050206 Environmental Monitoring
0502 Environmental Science And Management
0602 Ecology
0608 Zoology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, BirdLife Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084783

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 126 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 07 Jul 2016, 15:05:37 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.