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Criterion validity of the activPAL™ and ActiGraph for assessing children's sitting and standing time in a school classroom setting

Ridley, Kate, Ridgers, Nicola D. and Salmon, Jo 2016, Criterion validity of the activPAL™ and ActiGraph for assessing children's sitting and standing time in a school classroom setting, International journal of behavioural nutrition, vol. 13, Article number : 75, pp. 1-5, doi: 10.1186/s12966-016-0402-x.

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Title Criterion validity of the activPAL™ and ActiGraph for assessing children's sitting and standing time in a school classroom setting
Author(s) Ridley, Kate
Ridgers, Nicola D.
Salmon, Jo
Journal name International journal of behavioural nutrition
Volume number 13
Season Article number : 75
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) accelerometry
inclinometry
sedentary
youth
Summary BACKGROUND: Few studies have investigated the accuracy of the ActiGraph (AG) GTX3 accelerometer for assessing children's sitting and standing time. The activPAL (aP) has an inclinometer function that enables it to distinguish between sitting/lying and standing; however, its accuracy for assessing sitting and standing in older children is unknown. This study validated the accuracy of these devices for estimating sitting and standing time in a school classroom against a criterion measure of direct observation (DO). FINDINGS: Forty children in grades 5-7 wore both devices while being video recorded during two school lessons. AG and aP data were simultaneously collected in 15-s epochs. Individual participant DO and aP data were recorded as total time spent sitting/lying, standing and stepping. AG data were converted into time spent sitting and standing using previously established cut-points. Compared with DO, the aP underestimated sitting time (mean bias = -1.9 min, 95 % LoA = -8.9 to 5.2 min) and overestimated standing time (mean bias = 1.8 min, 95% LoA = -9.6 to 13.3 min). The best-performing AG cut-point across both sitting and standing (<75 counts/15 s) was more accurate than the aP, underestimating sitting time (mean bias = -0.8 min, 95 % LoA = -10.5 to 9.9 min) and standing time (mean bias = -0.4 min, 95% LoA = -9.8 to 9.1 min), but was less precise as evidenced by wider LoAs and poorer correlations with DO (sitting r = 0.86 aP vs 0.80 AG; standing r = 0.78 aP vs 0.60 AG). CONCLUSIONS: The aP demonstrated good accuracy and precision for assessing free-living sitting and standing time in classroom settings. The AG was most accurate using a cut-point of < 75 counts/15 s. Further studies should validate the monitors in settings with greater inter- and intra-individual variation in movement patterns.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0402-x
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084892

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Created: Wed, 13 Jul 2016, 16:16:55 EST

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