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Less effort, better results: how does music act on prefrontal cortex in older adults during verbal encoding? An fNIRS study

Ferreri, Laura, Bigand, Emmanuel, Perrey, Stephane, Muthalib, Makii, Bard, Patrick and Bugaiska, Aurelia 2014, Less effort, better results: how does music act on prefrontal cortex in older adults during verbal encoding? An fNIRS study, Frontiers in human neuroscience, vol. 8, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00301.

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Title Less effort, better results: how does music act on prefrontal cortex in older adults during verbal encoding? An fNIRS study
Author(s) Ferreri, Laura
Bigand, Emmanuel
Perrey, Stephane
Muthalib, Makii
Bard, Patrick
Bugaiska, Aurelia
Journal name Frontiers in human neuroscience
Volume number 8
Article ID 301
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2014
Keyword(s) episodic encoding
fNIRS
music
older adults
prefrontal cortex
Summary Several neuroimaging studies of cognitive aging revealed deficits in episodic memory abilities as a result of prefrontal cortex (PFC) limitations. Improving episodic memory performance despite PFC deficits is thus a critical issue in aging research. Listening to music stimulates cognitive performance in several non-purely musical activities (e.g., language and memory). Thus, music could represent a rich and helpful source during verbal encoding and therefore help subsequent retrieval. Furthermore, such benefit could be reflected in less demand of PFC, which is known to be crucial for encoding processes. This study aimed to investigate whether music may improve episodic memory in older adults while decreasing the PFC activity. Sixteen healthy older adults (μ = 64.5 years) encoded lists of words presented with or without a musical background while their dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activity was monitored using a eight-channel continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system (Oxymon Mk III, Artinis, The Netherlands). Behavioral results indicated a better source-memory performance for words encoded with music compared to words encoded with silence (p < 0.05). Functional NIRS data revealed bilateral decrease of oxyhemoglobin values in the music encoding condition compared to the silence condition (p < 0.05), suggesting that music modulates the activity of the DLPFC during encoding in a less-demanding direction. Taken together, our results indicate that music can help older adults in memory performances by decreasing their PFC activity. These findings open new perspectives about music as tool for episodic memory rehabilitation on special populations with memory deficits due to frontal lobe damage such as Alzheimer's patients.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00301
Field of Research 110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920111 Nervous System and Disorders
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084979

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.