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Should patients in a persistent vegetative state be allowed to die? Guidelines for a new standard of care in Australian hospitals

Kendal, Evie and Maher, Laura-Jane 2015, Should patients in a persistent vegetative state be allowed to die? Guidelines for a new standard of care in Australian hospitals, Monash bioethics review, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 148-166, doi: 10.1007/s40592-015-0039-6.

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Title Should patients in a persistent vegetative state be allowed to die? Guidelines for a new standard of care in Australian hospitals
Author(s) Kendal, Evie
Maher, Laura-Jane
Journal name Monash bioethics review
Volume number 33
Issue number 2
Start page 148
End page 166
Total pages 19
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2015-06
ISSN 1321-2753
Keyword(s) Euthanasia
MCS
Minimally conscious state
PVS
Persistent vegetative state
Australia
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Life Support Care
Standard of Care
Summary In this article we will be arguing in favour of legislating to protect doctors who bring about the deaths of PVS patients, regardless of whether the death is through passive means (e.g. the discontinuation of artificial feeding and respiration) or active means (e.g. through the administration of pharmaceuticals known to hasten death in end-of-life care). We will first discuss the ethical dilemmas doctors and lawmakers faced in the more famous PVS cases arising in the US and UK, before exploring what the law should be regarding such patients, particularly in Australia. We will continue by arguing in favour of allowing euthanasia in the interests of PVS patients, their families, and finally the wider community, before concluding with some suggestions for how these ethical arguments could be transformed into a set of guidelines for medical practice in this area.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s40592-015-0039-6
Field of Research 220199 Applied Ethics not elsewhere classified
2201 Applied Ethics
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085001

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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