You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Changes in behaviour drive inter-annual variability in the at-sea distribution of northern gannets

Warwick-Evans, V., Atkinson, P. W., Arnould, J. P. Y., Gauvain, R., Soanes, L., Robinson, L. A. and Green, J. A. 2016, Changes in behaviour drive inter-annual variability in the at-sea distribution of northern gannets, Marine biology, vol. 163, pp. 156-171, doi: 10.1007/s00227-016-2922-y.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
arnould-changesinbehaviourdrive-2016.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.02MB 3

Title Changes in behaviour drive inter-annual variability in the at-sea distribution of northern gannets
Author(s) Warwick-Evans, V.
Atkinson, P. W.
Arnould, J. P. Y.ORCID iD for Arnould, J. P. Y. orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Gauvain, R.
Soanes, L.
Robinson, L. A.
Green, J. A.
Contributor(s) Paiva, V
Kruger, L
Journal name Marine biology
Volume number 163
Start page 156
End page 171
Total pages 15
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2016-06
ISSN 1432-1793
Keyword(s) science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
marine & freshwater biology
foraging area fidelity
fuillemots uria-aalge
marine predator
morus-bassanus
reproductive success
individual specialization
atlantic oscillation
population-dynamics
climate variability
stable isotopes
Summary The at-sea distribution of seabirds primarily depends on the distance from their breeding colony, and the abundance, distribution and predictability of their prey, which are subject to strong spatial and temporal variation. Many seabirds have developed flexible foraging strategies to deal with this variation, such as increasing their foraging effort or switching to more predictable, less energy dense, prey, in poor conditions. These responses may vary both within and between individuals, and understanding this variability is vital to predict the population-level impacts of spatially explicit environmental disturbances, such as offshore windfarms. We conducted a multi-year tracking study in order to investigate the inter-annual variation in the foraging behaviour and location of a population of northern gannets breeding on Alderney in the English Channel. To do so, we investigated the link between individual-level behaviour and population-level behaviour. We found that a sample of gannets tracked in 2015 had longer trip durations, travelled further from the colony and had larger core foraging areas and home range areas than gannets tracked in previous years. This inter-annual variation may be associated with oceanographic conditions indexed by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Our findings suggest that this inter-annual variation was driven by individuals visiting larger areas in all of their trips rather than individuals diversifying to visit more, distinct areas. These findings suggest that, for gannets at least, if prey becomes less abundant or more widely distributed, more individuals may be required to forage further from the colony, thus increasing their likelihood of encountering pressures from spatially explicit anthropogenic disturbances.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00227-016-2922-y
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085032

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 46 Abstract Views, 4 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 18 Aug 2016, 19:35:43 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.