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User centric design, data analysis and performance of snowboard bindings

Collins, Paul K., Leen, Robert and Usma Alvarez, Clara 2016, User centric design, data analysis and performance of snowboard bindings, Procedia engineering, vol. 147, pp. 437-442, doi: 10.1016/j.proeng.2016.06.336.

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Title User centric design, data analysis and performance of snowboard bindings
Author(s) Collins, Paul K.
Leen, Robert
Usma Alvarez, ClaraORCID iD for Usma Alvarez, Clara orcid.org/0000-0003-4438-5582
Journal name Procedia engineering
Volume number 147
Start page 437
End page 442
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1877-7058
Summary This study focuses on soft boot snowboard bindings by looking at how users interact with their binding and proposes a possible solution to overcome such issues. Snowboarding is a multibillion-dollar sport that has only reached mainstream in the last 30 years its levels of progression in technology have evolved in that time. However, snowboard bindings for the most part still consist of the same basic architecture in the last 20 years. This study was aimed at taking a user centric point of view and using additive manufacturing technologies to be able to generate a new snowboard binding that is completely adaptable to the user. The initial part of the study was a survey of 280 snowboarders focussing on preferences, style and habits. This survey was generated from over 15 nations with the vast majority of boarders on the snow for five to fifty days a year. Significant emphasis was placed on the relationship between boarder binding set-up and occurrence of pain and/or injury. From the detailed survey it was found that boarder's experienced pain in the front foot/toe area as a result from the toe strap being too tight. However boarders wanted tighter bindings to increase responsiveness. Survey data was compared to ankle and foot biomechanics to build a relationship to assess the problem of pain versus responsiveness. The design stage of the study was to develop a binding that overcame the over-tightening of the binding but still maintain equivalent or better responsiveness compared to traditional bindings. The resulting design integrated the snowboard boot much more into the design, by using the sole as a "semi-rigid" platform and locking it in laterally between the heel cup and the new toe strap arrangement. The new design developed using additive manufacturing techniques was tested via qualitative and quantitative measures in the snow and in the lab. It was found that using the new arrangement in a system resulted in no loss of performance or responsiveness to the user. Due to the design and manufacturing approach users have the ability to customise the design to their specific needs.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.proeng.2016.06.336
Field of Research 091006 Manufacturing Processes and Technologies (excl Textiles)
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085039

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Engineering
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.