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Does a combination of virtual reality, neuromodulation and neuroimaging provide a comprehensive platform for neurorehabilitation? - A narrative review of the literature

Teo, Wei-Peng, Muthalib, Makii, Yamin, Sami, Hendy, Ashlee M, Bramstedt, Kelly, Kotsopoulos, Eleftheria, Perrey, Stephane and Ayaz, Hasan 2016, Does a combination of virtual reality, neuromodulation and neuroimaging provide a comprehensive platform for neurorehabilitation? - A narrative review of the literature, Frontiers in human neuroscience, vol. 10, no. 284, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00284.

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Title Does a combination of virtual reality, neuromodulation and neuroimaging provide a comprehensive platform for neurorehabilitation? - A narrative review of the literature
Author(s) Teo, Wei-PengORCID iD for Teo, Wei-Peng orcid.org/0000-0003-3929-9778
Muthalib, Makii
Yamin, Sami
Hendy, Ashlee M
Bramstedt, Kelly
Kotsopoulos, Eleftheria
Perrey, Stephane
Ayaz, Hasan
Journal name Frontiers in human neuroscience
Volume number 10
Issue number 284
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2016-06-24
ISSN 1662-5161
Keyword(s) neurorehabilitation
neuroplasticity
tDCS
fNIRS
EEG
virtual reality therapy
Summary In the last decade, virtual reality (VR) training has been used extensively in video games and military training to provide a sense of realism and environmental interaction to its users. More recently, VR training has been explored as a possible adjunct therapy for people with motor and mental health dysfunctions. The concept underlying VR therapy as a treatment for motor and cognitive dysfunction is to improve neuroplasticity of the brain by engaging users in multisensory training. In this review, we discuss the theoretical framework underlying the use of VR as a therapeutic intervention for neurorehabilitation and provide evidence for its use in treating motor and mental disorders such as cerebral palsy, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, and other related clinical areas. While this review provides some insights into the efficacy of VR in clinical rehabilitation and its complimentary use with neuroimaging (e.g., fNIRS and EEG) and neuromodulation (e.g., tDCS and rTMS), more research is needed to understand how different clinical conditions are affected by VR therapies (e.g., stimulus presentation, interactivity, control and types of VR). Future studies should consider large, longitudinal randomized controlled trials to determine the true potential of VR therapies in various clinical populations.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00284
Field of Research 110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920199 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Frontiers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085051

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Created: Fri, 22 Jul 2016, 14:31:50 EST

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