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Two studies on Twitter networks and tweet content in relation to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): conversation, information, and ‘Diary of a Daily Life’

Hemsley, Bronwyn and Palmer, Stuart 2016, Two studies on Twitter networks and tweet content in relation to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): conversation, information, and ‘Diary of a Daily Life’. In Georgiou, Andrew, Schaper, Louise K. and Whetton, Sue (ed), Digital health innovation for consumers, clinicians, connectivity and community, IOS Press, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, pp.41-47, doi: 10.3233/978-1-61499-666-8-41.

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Title Two studies on Twitter networks and tweet content in relation to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): conversation, information, and ‘Diary of a Daily Life’
Author(s) Hemsley, Bronwyn
Palmer, StuartORCID iD for Palmer, Stuart orcid.org/0000-0002-2517-0597
Title of book Digital health innovation for consumers, clinicians, connectivity and community
Editor(s) Georgiou, Andrew
Schaper, Louise K.
Whetton, Sue
Publication date 2016
Series Studies in health technology and informatics
Chapter number 7
Total chapters 20
Start page 41
End page 47
Total pages 7
Publisher IOS Press
Place of Publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Keyword(s) Twitter
tweet content
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Motor Neurone Disease
severe communication disability
Twitter research
Summary To date, there is no research examining how adults with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or Motor Neurone Disease (MND) and severe communication disability use Twitter, nor the use of Twitter in relation to ALS/MND beyond its use for fundraising and raising awareness. In this paper we (a) outline a rationale for the use of Twitter as a method of communication and information exchange for adults with ALS/MND, (b) detail multiple qualitative and quantitative methods used to analyse Twitter networks and tweet content in the our studies, and (c) present the results of two studies designed to provide insights on the use of Twitter by an adult with ALS/MND and by #ALS and #MND hashtag communities in Twitter. We will also discuss findings across the studies, implications for health service providers in Twitter, and directions for future Twitter research in relation to ALS/MND.
ISBN 9781614996651
9781614996668
Language eng
DOI 10.3233/978-1-61499-666-8-41
Field of Research 110904 Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases
170204 Linguistic Processes (incl Speech Production and Comprehension)
080709 Social and Community Informatics
Socio Economic Objective 920201 Allied Health Therapies (excl. Mental Health Services)
HERDC Research category B1 Book chapter
ERA Research output type B Book chapter
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors and IOS Press
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085068

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.