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A prospective cohort study of antipsychotic medications in pregnancy: the first 147 pregnancies and 100 one year old babies

Kulkarni, Jayashri, Worsley, Roisin, Gilbert, Heather, Gavrilidis, Emorfia, Van Rheenen, Tmsyn E., Wang, Wei, McCauley, Kay and Fitzgerald, Paul 2014, A prospective cohort study of antipsychotic medications in pregnancy: the first 147 pregnancies and 100 one year old babies, PLoS one, vol. 9, no. 5, Article number : e94788, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0094788.

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Title A prospective cohort study of antipsychotic medications in pregnancy: the first 147 pregnancies and 100 one year old babies
Author(s) Kulkarni, Jayashri
Worsley, Roisin
Gilbert, Heather
Gavrilidis, Emorfia
Van Rheenen, Tmsyn E.
Wang, WeiORCID iD for Wang, Wei orcid.org/0000-0003-4287-1704
McCauley, Kay
Fitzgerald, Paul
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 9
Issue number 5
Season Article number : e94788
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) adult
antipsychotic agents
cohort studies
dose-response relationship, drug
female
humans
infant
male
mental disorders
pregnancy
pregnancy complications
pregnancy outcome
prospective studies
registries
safety
Summary BACKGROUND: Many women diagnosed with varying psychiatric disorders take antipsychotic medications during pregnancy. The safety of antipsychotic medications in pregnancy is largely unknown.

METHODS: We established the National Register of Antipsychotic Medications in Pregnancy in 2005. Women who are pregnant and taking an antipsychotic medication are interviewed every 6 weeks during pregnancy and then followed until their babies are one year old. The baby's progress is closely followed for the first year of life.

FINDINGS: As of April 18 2012, 147 pregnancies had been followed through to completion. There were 142 live births and data is available for 100 one year old babies. 18% of babies were born preterm, with a higher dose of antipsychotic medication correlating to an increased likelihood of premature delivery; 43% of babies required special care nursery or intensive care after birth; 37% had any degree of respiratory distress and 15% of babies developed withdrawal symptoms. Congenital anomalies were seen in eight babies. Most pregnancies resulted in the birth of live, healthy babies. The use of mood stabilisers or higher doses of antipsychotics during pregnancy increased the likelihood of babies experiencing respiratory distress or admission to Special Care Nursery or Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

CONCLUSION: There is a great need for safety and efficacy information about the use of antipsychotic medications in pregnancy. Live, healthy babies are the most common outcome following the use of antipsychotic medication in pregnancy, but clinicians should be particularly mindful of neonatal problems such as respiratory distress.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0094788
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085069

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.