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Effects of cold water immersion and active recovery on hemodynamics and recovery of muscle strength following resistance exercise

Roberts, Llion A., Muthalib, Makii, Stanley, Jamie, Lichtwark, Glen, Nosaka, Kazunori, Coombes, Jeff S. and Peake, Jonathan M. 2015, Effects of cold water immersion and active recovery on hemodynamics and recovery of muscle strength following resistance exercise, American journal of physiology - regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology, vol. 309, no. 4, pp. R389-R398, doi: 10.1152/ajpregu.00151.2015.

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Title Effects of cold water immersion and active recovery on hemodynamics and recovery of muscle strength following resistance exercise
Author(s) Roberts, Llion A.
Muthalib, Makii
Stanley, Jamie
Lichtwark, Glen
Nosaka, Kazunori
Coombes, Jeff S.
Peake, Jonathan M.
Journal name American journal of physiology - regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology
Volume number 309
Issue number 4
Start page R389
End page R398
Total pages 10
Publisher APS Journal (American Physiological Society)
Place of publication Bethesda, M.D.
Publication date 2015-08-15
ISSN 1522-1490
Keyword(s) blood flow
cryotherapy
muscle oxygenation
recovery
Bicycling
Blood Pressure
Body Temperature
Cold Temperature
Energy Metabolism
Heart Rate
Hemodynamics
Humans
Immersion
Isometric Contraction
Male
Muscle Strength
Muscle, Skeletal
Oxygen Consumption
Recovery of Function
Regional Blood Flow
Resistance Training
Time Factors
Water
Young Adult
Summary Cold water immersion (CWI) and active recovery (ACT) are frequently used as postexercise recovery strategies. However, the physiological effects of CWI and ACT after resistance exercise are not well characterized. We examined the effects of CWI and ACT on cardiac output (Q̇), muscle oxygenation (SmO2), blood volume (tHb), muscle temperature (Tmuscle), and isometric strength after resistance exercise. On separate days, 10 men performed resistance exercise, followed by 10 min CWI at 10°C or 10 min ACT (low-intensity cycling). Q̇ (7.9 ± 2.7 l) and Tmuscle (2.2 ± 0.8°C) increased, whereas SmO2 (-21.5 ± 8.8%) and tHb (-10.1 ± 7.7 μM) decreased after exercise (P < 0.05). During CWI, Q̇ (-1.1 ± 0.7 l) and Tmuscle (-6.6 ± 5.3°C) decreased, while tHb (121 ± 77 μM) increased (P < 0.05). In the hour after CWI, Q̇ and Tmuscle remained low, while tHb also decreased (P < 0.05). By contrast, during ACT, Q̇ (3.9 ± 2.3 l), Tmuscle (2.2 ± 0.5°C), SmO2 (17.1 ± 5.7%), and tHb (91 ± 66 μM) all increased (P < 0.05). In the hour after ACT, Tmuscle, and tHb remained high (P < 0.05). Peak isometric strength during 10-s maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs) did not change significantly after CWI, whereas it decreased after ACT (-30 to -45 Nm; P < 0.05). Muscle deoxygenation time during MVCs increased after ACT (P < 0.05), but not after CWI. Muscle reoxygenation time after MVCs tended to increase after CWI (P = 0.052). These findings suggest first that hemodynamics and muscle temperature after resistance exercise are dependent on ambient temperature and metabolic demands with skeletal muscle, and second, that recovery of strength after resistance exercise is independent of changes in hemodynamics and muscle temperature.
Language eng
DOI 10.1152/ajpregu.00151.2015
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
06 Biological Sciences
11 Medical And Health Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, APS Journal (American Physiological Society)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085097

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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