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The effect of local vs remote experimental pain on motor learning and sensorimotor integration using a complex typing task

Dancey, Erin, Murphy, Bernadette A., Andrew, Danielle and Yielder, Paul 2016, The effect of local vs remote experimental pain on motor learning and sensorimotor integration using a complex typing task, Pain: the journal of the international association for the study of pain, vol. 157, no. 8, pp. 1682-1695, doi: 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000570.

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Title The effect of local vs remote experimental pain on motor learning and sensorimotor integration using a complex typing task
Author(s) Dancey, Erin
Murphy, Bernadette A.
Andrew, Danielle
Yielder, Paul
Journal name Pain: the journal of the international association for the study of pain
Volume number 157
Issue number 8
Start page 1682
End page 1695
Total pages 14
Publisher Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2016-08
Keyword(s) somatosensory evoked potentials
motor learning
local pain
remote pain
sensorimotor integration
Summary Recent work demonstrated that capsaicin-induced acute pain improved motor learning performance; however, baselineaccuracy was very high, making it impossible to discern the impact of acute pain onmotor learning and retention. In addition,the effects of the spatial location of capsaicin application were not explored. Two experiments were conducted to determinethe interactive effects of acute pain vs control (experiment 1) and local vs remote acute pain (experiment 2) on motor learningand sensorimotor processing. For both experiments, somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) amplitudes and motor learningacquisition and retention (accuracy and response time) data were collected at baseline, after application, and aftermotor learning. Experiment 1: N11 (P , 0.05), N13 (P , 0.05), and N30 (P , 0.05) SEP peak amplitudes increased aftermotor learning in both groups, whereas the N20 SEP peak increased in the control group (P , 0.05). At baseline, theintervention group outperformed the control group in accuracy (P , 0.001). Response time improved after motor learning(P , 0.001) and at retention (P , 0.001). Experiment 2: The P25 SEP peak decreased in the local group after application ofcapsaicin cream (P , 0.01), whereas the N30 SEP peaks increased after motor learning in both groups (P , 0.05). Accuracyimproved in the local group at retention (P , 0.005), and response time improved after motor learning (P , 0.005) and atretention (P , 0.001). This study suggests that acute pain may increase focal attention to the body part used in motorlearning, contributing to our understanding of how the location of pain impacts somatosensory processing and theassociated motor learning.
Language eng
DOI 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000570
Field of Research 110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920111 Nervous System and Disorders
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, International Association for the Study of Pain
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085111

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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