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Restoration rocks: integrating abiotic and biotic habitat restoration to conserve threatened species and reduce fire fuel load

McDougall, Alice, Milner, Richard N. C., Driscoll, Don A. and Smith, Annabel L. 2016, Restoration rocks: integrating abiotic and biotic habitat restoration to conserve threatened species and reduce fire fuel load, Biodiversity and conservation, vol. 25, no. 8, pp. 1529-1542, doi: 10.1007/s10531-016-1136-4.

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Title Restoration rocks: integrating abiotic and biotic habitat restoration to conserve threatened species and reduce fire fuel load
Author(s) McDougall, Alice
Milner, Richard N. C.
Driscoll, Don A.ORCID iD for Driscoll, Don A. orcid.org/0000-0002-1560-5235
Smith, Annabel L.
Journal name Biodiversity and conservation
Volume number 25
Issue number 8
Start page 1529
End page 1542
Total pages 14
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2016-07
ISSN 0960-3115
1572-9710
Keyword(s) ecological restoration
fire management
habitat loss
invasive species
urban ecology
wildland-urban interface
Summary With rapid urban expansion, biodiversity conservation and human asset protection often require different regimes for managing wildfire risk. We conducted a controlled, replicated experiment to optimise habitat restoration for the threatened Australian pink-tailed worm-lizard, Aprasia parapulchella while reducing fire fuel load in a rapidly developing urban area. We used dense addition of natural rock (30 % cover) and native grass revegetation (Themedatriandra and Poasieberiana) to restore critical habitat elements. Combinations of fire and herbicide (Glyphosate) were used to reduce fuel load and invasive exotic species. Rock restoration combined with herbicide application met the widest range of restoration goals: it reduced fire fuel load, increased ant occurrence (the primary prey of A. parapulchella) in the short-term and increased the growth and survival of native grasses. Lizards colonised the restored habitat within a year of treatment. Our study documents an innovative way by which conflicts between biodiversity conservation and human asset protection can be overcome.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s10531-016-1136-4
Field of Research 050102 Ecosystem Function
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
060299 Ecology not elsewhere classified
0501 Ecological Applications
0502 Environmental Science And Management
0602 Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Springer Science + Business Media Dordrecht
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085157

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