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Measuring chronic condition self-management in an Australian community: factor structure of the revised Partners in Health (PIH) scale

Smith, David, Harvey, Peter, Lawn, Sharon, Harris, Melanie and Battersby, Malcolm 2017, Measuring chronic condition self-management in an Australian community: factor structure of the revised Partners in Health (PIH) scale, Quality of life research, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 149-159, doi: 10.1007/s11136-016-1368-5.

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Title Measuring chronic condition self-management in an Australian community: factor structure of the revised Partners in Health (PIH) scale
Author(s) Smith, David
Harvey, PeterORCID iD for Harvey, Peter orcid.org/0000-0003-2983-663X
Lawn, Sharon
Harris, Melanie
Battersby, Malcolm
Journal name Quality of life research
Volume number 26
Issue number 1
Start page 149
End page 159
Total pages 11
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Cham, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-01
ISSN 1573-2649
Keyword(s) partners in health (PIH)
chronic conditions
self-management
Bayesian factor analysis
Summary Purpose To evaluate the factor structure of the revised Partners in Health (PIH) scale for measuring chronic condition self-management in a representative sample from the Australian community.

Methods A series of consultations between clinical groups underpinned the revision of the PIH. The factors in the revised instrument were proposed to be: knowledge of illness and treatment, patient–health professional partnership, recognition and management of symptoms and coping with chronic illness. Participants (N = 904) reporting having a chronic illness completed the revised 12-item scale. Two a priori models, the 4-factor and bi-factor models were then evaluated using Bayesian confirmatory factor analysis (BCFA). Final model selection was established on model complexity, posterior predictive p values and deviance information criterion.

Results Both 4-factor and bi-factor BCFA models with small informative priors for cross-loadings provided an acceptable fit with the data. The 4-factor model was shown to provide a better and more parsimonious fit with the observed data in terms of substantive theory. McDonald’s omega coefficients indicated that the reliability of subscale raw scores was mostly in the acceptable range.

Conclusion
The findings showed that the PIH scale is a relevant and structurally valid instrument for measuring chronic condition self-management in an Australian community. The PIH scale may help health professionals to introduce the concept of self-management to their patients and provide assessment of areas of self-management. A limitation is the narrow range of validated PIH measurement properties to date. Further research is needed to evaluate other important properties such as test–retest reliability, responsiveness over time and content validity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s11136-016-1368-5
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Springer International
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085170

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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