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Patient participation in postoperative care activities in patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery: multimedia intervention for managing patient experience (MIME). Study protocol for a cluster randomised crossover trial

McDonall, Jo, de Steiger, Richard, Reynolds, John, Redley, Bernice, Livingston, Patricia and Botti, Mari 2016, Patient participation in postoperative care activities in patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery: multimedia intervention for managing patient experience (MIME). Study protocol for a cluster randomised crossover trial, BMC musculoskeletal disorders, vol. 17, Article number : 294, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12891-016-1133-5.

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Title Patient participation in postoperative care activities in patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery: multimedia intervention for managing patient experience (MIME). Study protocol for a cluster randomised crossover trial
Author(s) McDonall, Jo
de Steiger, Richard
Reynolds, John
Redley, BerniceORCID iD for Redley, Bernice orcid.org/0000-0002-2376-3989
Livingston, Patricia
Botti, Mari
Journal name BMC musculoskeletal disorders
Volume number 17
Season Article number : 294
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1471-2474
Keyword(s) acute care
cluster randomised crossover trial
health service evaluation
multimedia intervention
patient experience
patient involvement
patient participation
patient satisfaction
Summary BACKGROUND: Patient participation is an important indicator of quality care. Currently, there is little evidence to support the belief that participation in care is possible for patients during the acute postoperative period. Previous work indicates that there is very little opportunity for patients to participate in care in the acute context. Patients require both capability, in terms of having the required knowledge and understanding of how they can be involved in their care, and the opportunity, facilitated by clinicians, to engage in their acute postoperative care. This cluster randomised crossover trial aims to test whether a multimedia intervention improves patient participation in the acute postoperative context, as determined by pain intensity and recovery outcomes.

METHODS/DESIGN: A total of 240 patients admitted for primary total knee replacement surgery will be invited to participate in a cluster randomised, crossover trial and concurrent process evaluation in at least two wards at a major non-profit private hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Patients admitted to the intervention ward will receive the multimedia intervention daily from Day 1 to Day 5 (or day of discharge, if prior). The intervention will be delivered by nurses via an iPad™, comprising information on the goals of care for each day following surgery. Patients admitted to the control ward will receive usual care as determined by care pathways currently in use across the organization. The primary endpoint is the "worst pain experienced in the past 24 h" on Day 3 following TKR surgery. Pain intensity will be measured using the numerical rating scale. Secondary outcomes are interference of pain on activities of daily living, length of stay in hospital, function and pain following TKR surgery, overall satisfaction with hospitalisation, postoperative complications and hospital readmission.

DISCUSSION: The results of this study will contribute to our understanding of the effectiveness of interventions that provide knowledge and opportunity for patient participation during postoperative in-hospital care in actually increasing participation, and the impact of participation on patient outcomes. The results of this study will also provide data about the barriers and enablers to participation in the acute care context.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-1133-5
Field of Research 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085193

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Created: Wed, 03 Aug 2016, 08:12:51 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.