Prevalence and correlates of drink driving within patrons of Australian night-time entertainment precincts

Curtis, Ashlee, Coomber, Kerri, Hyder, Shannon, Droste, Nic, Pennay, Amy, Jenkinson, Rebecca, Mayshak, Richelle and Miller, Peter G. 2016, Prevalence and correlates of drink driving within patrons of Australian night-time entertainment precincts, Accident analysis and prevention, vol. 95, no. Part A, pp. 187-191, doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2016.07.018.

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Title Prevalence and correlates of drink driving within patrons of Australian night-time entertainment precincts
Author(s) Curtis, AshleeORCID iD for Curtis, Ashlee orcid.org/0000-0001-9182-2840
Coomber, Kerri
Hyder, ShannonORCID iD for Hyder, Shannon orcid.org/0000-0002-7617-3819
Droste, Nic
Pennay, Amy
Jenkinson, Rebecca
Mayshak, RichelleORCID iD for Mayshak, Richelle orcid.org/0000-0003-2075-9447
Miller, Peter G.ORCID iD for Miller, Peter G. orcid.org/0000-0002-6896-5437
Journal name Accident analysis and prevention
Volume number 95
Issue number Part A
Start page 187
End page 191
Total pages 5
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-10
ISSN 0001-4575
1879-2057
Keyword(s) correlates
drink driving
driving under the influence
night-time entertainment precincts
prevalence
Summary BACKGROUND: Drink driving is a significant public health concern, and contributes to many road fatalities worldwide. The current study is the first to examine the prevalence and correlates of drink driving behavior in a sample of night-time entertainment precinct attendees in Australia. METHODS: Interviews were conducted with 4214 night-time entertainment precinct attendees in two metropolitan and three regional cities in Australia. Seven correlates of self-reported drink driving were examined: gender, age, occupation, blood alcohol concentration (BAC), alcohol consumed prior to attending a licensed venue, energy drink consumption, and other drug consumption. RESULTS: Fourteen percent of night-time entertainment precinct attendees reported drink driving in the past three months. Bivariate logistic regression models indicated that males were significantly more likely than females to report drink driving in the past three months. Blue-collar workers and sales/clerical/administrative workers were significantly more likely to report drink driving behavior in the past three months than white-collar workers. The likelihood of reporting drink driving during the three months prior to interview significantly increased as BAC on the current night out increased, and when patrons reported engaging in pre-drinking or other drug use. The multivariate model presented a similar pattern of results, however BAC and pre-drinking on the night of the interview were no longer independent significant predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Males, blue collar/sales/clerical/administrative workers, and illicit drug consumers were more likely to report engaging in drink driving behavior than their counterparts. Interventions should focus on addressing the considerable proportion night-time entertainment precinct attendees who report engaging in drink driving behavior.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2016.07.018
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1507 Transportation And Freight Services
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085196

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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