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The adoption of roles by primary care providers during implementation of the new chronic disease guidelines in urban Mongolia: a qualitative study

Chimeddamba, Oyun, Ayton, Darshini, Bazarragchaa, Nansalmaa, Dorjsuren, Bayarsaikhan, Peeters, Anna and Joyce, Catherine 2016, The adoption of roles by primary care providers during implementation of the new chronic disease guidelines in urban Mongolia: a qualitative study, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.3390/ijerph13040407.

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Title The adoption of roles by primary care providers during implementation of the new chronic disease guidelines in urban Mongolia: a qualitative study
Author(s) Chimeddamba, Oyun
Ayton, Darshini
Bazarragchaa, Nansalmaa
Dorjsuren, Bayarsaikhan
Peeters, Anna
Joyce, Catherine
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 13
Issue number 4
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2016-04-07
ISSN 1661-7827
1660-4601
Keyword(s) Mongolia
clinical guidelines
family health centre
primary care
role delineation
Summary (1) BACKGROUND: In 2011, new chronic disease guidelines were introduced across Mongolia. No formal advice was provided regarding role delineation. This study aimed to analyse the roles that different primary care providers adopted, and the variations in these, in the implementation of the guidelines in urban Mongolia;

(2) METHODS: Ten group interviews with nurses and ten individual interviews each with practice doctors and practice directors were conducted. Data was analysed using a thematic approach based on the identified themes relevant to role delineation;

(3) RESULTS: There was some variability and flexibility in role delineation. Factors involving teamwork, task rotation and practice flexibility facilitated well the guideline implementation. However, factors including expectations and decision making, nursing shortage, and training gaps adversely influenced in the roles and responsibilities. Some role confusion and dissatisfaction was identified, often associated with a lack of training or staff turnover;

(4) CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that adequate ongoing training is required to maximize the range of roles particular provider types, especially primary care nurses, are competent to perform. Ensuring that role delineation is specified in guidelines could remove confusion and enhance implementation of such guidelines.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph13040407
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085203

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.