The role of the microbial metabolites including tryptophan catabolites and short chain fatty acids in the pathophysiology of immune-inflammatory and neuroimmunue disease.

Morris, Gerwyn, Berk, Michael, Carvalho, Andre, Caso, Javier R, Sanz, Yolanda, Walder, Ken and Maes, Michael 2016, The role of the microbial metabolites including tryptophan catabolites and short chain fatty acids in the pathophysiology of immune-inflammatory and neuroimmunue disease., Molecular neurobiology, In press, pp. 1-20, doi: 10.1007/s12035-016-0004-2.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The role of the microbial metabolites including tryptophan catabolites and short chain fatty acids in the pathophysiology of immune-inflammatory and neuroimmunue disease.
Author(s) Morris, Gerwyn
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Carvalho, Andre
Caso, Javier R
Sanz, Yolanda
Walder, KenORCID iD for Walder, Ken orcid.org/0000-0002-6758-4763
Maes, Michael
Journal name Molecular neurobiology
Season In press
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1559-1182
Keyword(s) Autism
Bacterial translocation
Diabetes type 2
Immune inflammation
Leaky gut
Oxidative stress
Summary There is a growing awareness that gut commensal metabolites play a major role in host physiology and indeed the pathophysiology of several illnesses. The composition of the microbiota largely determines the levels of tryptophan in the systemic circulation and hence, indirectly, the levels of serotonin in the brain. Some microbiota synthesize neurotransmitters directly, e.g., gamma-amino butyric acid, while modulating the synthesis of neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and norepinephrine, and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). The composition of the microbiota determines the levels and nature of tryptophan catabolites (TRYCATs) which in turn has profound effects on aryl hydrocarbon receptors, thereby influencing epithelial barrier integrity and the presence of an inflammatory or tolerogenic environment in the intestine and beyond. The composition of the microbiota also determines the levels and ratios of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) such as butyrate and propionate. Butyrate is a key energy source for colonocytes. Dysbiosis leading to reduced levels of SCFAs, notably butyrate, therefore may have adverse effects on epithelial barrier integrity, energy homeostasis, and the T helper 17/regulatory/T cell balance. Moreover, dysbiosis leading to reduced butyrate levels may increase bacterial translocation into the systemic circulation. As examples, we describe the role of microbial metabolites in the pathophysiology of diabetes type 2 and autism.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s12035-016-0004-2
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1702 Cognitive Science
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085220

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 51 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 347 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 18 Aug 2016, 12:22:00 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.