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Validity of a wearable accelerometer device to measure average acceleration values during high speed running

Alexander, Jeremy P., Hopkinson, Trent L., Wundersitz, Daniel, Serpell, Benjamin G., Mara, Jocelyn K. and Ball, Nick B. 2016, Validity of a wearable accelerometer device to measure average acceleration values during high speed running, Journal of strength and conditioning research, vol. 30, no. 11, pp. 3007-3013, doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001396.

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Title Validity of a wearable accelerometer device to measure average acceleration values during high speed running
Author(s) Alexander, Jeremy P.
Hopkinson, Trent L.
Wundersitz, Daniel
Serpell, Benjamin G.
Mara, Jocelyn K.
Ball, Nick B.
Journal name Journal of strength and conditioning research
Volume number 30
Issue number 11
Start page 3007
End page 3013
Total pages 7
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2016-11
ISSN 1533-4287
Keyword(s) wearable tracking device
accuracy
sprinting
Summary The aim of this study was to determine the validity of an accelerometer to measure average acceleration values during high speed running. Thirteen subjects performed three sprint efforts over a 40 m distance (n = 39). Acceleration was measured using a 100 Hz tri-axial accelerometer integrated within a wearable tracking device (SPI-HPU, GPSports, Canberra). To provide a concurrent measure of acceleration, timing gates were positioned at 10 m intervals (0 m - 40 m). Accelerometer data collected during 0 m - 10 m and 10 m - 20 m provided a measure of average acceleration values. Accelerometer data was recorded as the raw output and filtered by applying a 3 point moving average and a 10 point moving average. The accelerometer could not measure average acceleration values during high speed running. The accelerometer significantly overestimated average acceleration values during both 0 m - 10 m and 10 m - 20 m, regardless of the data filtering technique (p < 0.001). Body mass significantly affected all accelerometer variables (p < 0.10, partial η = 0.091 - 0.219). Body mass and the absence of a gravity compensation formula affect the accuracy and practicality of accelerometers. Until GPSports integrated accelerometers incorporate a gravity compensation formula the usefulness of any accelerometer derived algorithms is questionable.
Language eng
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001396
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, National Strength and Conditioning Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085275

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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