You are not logged in.

The natural history of internalizing behaviours from adolescence to emerging adulthood: findings from the Australian Temperament Project

Betts, K. S., Baker, P., Alati, R., McIntosh, J. E., Macdonald, J. A., Letcher, P. and Olsson, C. A. 2016, The natural history of internalizing behaviours from adolescence to emerging adulthood: findings from the Australian Temperament Project, Psychological medicine, vol. 46, no. 13, pp. 2815-2827, doi: 10.1017/S0033291716001495.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The natural history of internalizing behaviours from adolescence to emerging adulthood: findings from the Australian Temperament Project
Author(s) Betts, K. S.
Baker, P.
Alati, R.
McIntosh, J. E.ORCID iD for McIntosh, J. E. orcid.org/0000-0003-4709-5003
Macdonald, J. A.ORCID iD for Macdonald, J. A. orcid.org/0000-0001-9451-2709
Letcher, P.
Olsson, C. A.ORCID iD for Olsson, C. A. orcid.org/0000-0002-5927-2014
Journal name Psychological medicine
Volume number 46
Issue number 13
Start page 2815
End page 2827
Total pages 13
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2016-10
ISSN 0033-2917
1469-8978
Keyword(s) adolescence
anxiety
childhood
depression
young adulthood
Summary BACKGROUND: The aims of the study were to describe the patterning and persistence of anxiety and depressive symptoms from adolescence to young adulthood and to examine long-term developmental relationships with earlier patterns of internalizing behaviours in childhood. METHOD: We used parallel processes latent growth curve modelling to build trajectories of internalizing from adolescence to adulthood, using seven waves of follow-ups (ages 11-27 years) from 1406 participants of the Australian Temperament Project. We then used latent factors to capture the stability of maternal reported child internalizing symptoms across three waves of early childhood follow-ups (ages 5, 7 and 9 years), and examined relationships among these patterns of symptoms across the three developmental periods, adjusting for gender and socio-economic status. RESULTS: We observed strong continuity in depressive symptoms from adolescence to young adulthood. In contrast, adolescent anxiety was not persistent across the same period, nor was it related to later depressive symptoms. Anxiety was, however, related to non-specific stress in young adulthood, but only moderately so. Although childhood internalizing was related to adolescent and adult profiles, the associations were weak and indirect by adulthood, suggesting that other factors are important in the development of internalizing symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Once established, adolescent depressive symptoms are not only strongly persistent, but also have the potential to differentiate into anxiety in young adulthood. Relationships with childhood internalizing symptoms are weak, suggesting that early adolescence may be an important period for targeted intervention, but also that further research into the childhood origins of internalizing behaviours is needed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0033291716001495
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1701 Psychology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1109 Neurosciences
Socio Economic Objective 920414 Substance Abuse
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085287

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 269 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 18 Aug 2016, 12:27:08 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.