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Parasite pressures on feral honey bees (Apis mellifera sp.)

Thompson, Catherine E., Biesmeijer, Jacobus C., Allnutt, Theodore R., Pietravalle, Stephane and Budge, Giles E. 2014, Parasite pressures on feral honey bees (Apis mellifera sp.), PLoS one, vol. 9, no. 8, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0105164.

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Title Parasite pressures on feral honey bees (Apis mellifera sp.)
Formatted title Parasite pressures on feral honey bees (Apis mellifera sp.)
Author(s) Thompson, Catherine E.
Biesmeijer, Jacobus C.
Allnutt, Theodore R.ORCID iD for Allnutt, Theodore R. orcid.org/0000-0002-1347-3777
Pietravalle, Stephane
Budge, Giles E.
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 9
Issue number 8
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2014-08
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Animals
Bees
Host-Parasite Interactions
Insect Viruses
Mites
Population Dynamics
Summary Feral honey bee populations have been reported to be in decline due to the spread of Varroa destructor, an ectoparasitic mite that when left uncontrolled leads to virus build-up and colony death. While pests and diseases are known causes of large-scale managed honey bee colony losses, no studies to date have considered the wider pathogen burden in feral colonies, primarily due to the difficulty in locating and sampling colonies, which often nest in inaccessible locations such as church spires and tree tops. In addition, little is known about the provenance of feral colonies and whether they represent a reservoir of Varroa tolerant material that could be used in apiculture. Samples of forager bees were collected from paired feral and managed honey bee colonies and screened for the presence of ten honey bee pathogens and pests using qPCR. Prevalence and quantity was similar between the two groups for the majority of pathogens, however feral honey bees contained a significantly higher level of deformed wing virus than managed honey bee colonies. An assessment of the honey bee race was completed for each colony using three measures of wing venation. There were no apparent differences in wing morphometry between feral and managed colonies, suggesting feral colonies could simply be escapees from the managed population. Interestingly, managed honey bee colonies not treated for Varroa showed similar, potentially lethal levels of deformed wing virus to that of feral colonies. The potential for such findings to explain the large fall in the feral population and the wider context of the importance of feral colonies as potential pathogen reservoirs is discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0105164
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Thompson et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085306

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.