Framing the private land conservation conversation: Strategic framing of the benefits of conservation participation could increase landholder engagement

Kusmanoff, Alexander M, Hardy, Mathew J, Fidler, Fiona, Maffey, Georgina, Raymond, Christopher, Reed, M S, Fitzsimons, James and Bekessy, Sarah A 2016, Framing the private land conservation conversation: Strategic framing of the benefits of conservation participation could increase landholder engagement, Environmental science and policy, vol. 61, pp. 124-128, doi: 10.1016/j.envsci.2016.03.016.

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Title Framing the private land conservation conversation: Strategic framing of the benefits of conservation participation could increase landholder engagement
Author(s) Kusmanoff, Alexander M
Hardy, Mathew J
Fidler, Fiona
Maffey, Georgina
Raymond, Christopher
Reed, M S
Fitzsimons, JamesORCID iD for Fitzsimons, James orcid.org/0000-0003-4277-8040
Bekessy, Sarah A
Journal name Environmental science and policy
Volume number 61
Start page 124
End page 128
Total pages 5
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-07-01
ISSN 1873-6416
1873-6416
Keyword(s) Framing
Value orientation
Biodiversity
Conservation
Private land conservation
Market-based instruments
Communications
Value orientation
Marketing
Summary How conservation messages are framed will impact the success of our efforts to engage people in conservation action. This is highly relevant in the private land conservation (PLC) sector given the low participation rates of landholders. Using a case study of PLC schemes targeted at Australian landholders, we present the first systematic analysis of communication strategies used by organisations and government departments delivering those schemes to engage the public. We develop a novel approach for analysing the framing of conservation messages that codes the stated benefits of schemes according to value orientation. We categorised the benefits as flowing to either the landholder, to society, or to the environment, corresponding to the egoistic, altruistic and biospheric value orientations that have been shown to influence human behaviour. We find that messages are biased towards environmental benefits. Surprisingly, this is the case even for market-based schemes that have the explicit objective of appealing to production-focussed landholders and those who are not already involved in conservation. The risk is that PLC schemes framed in this way will fail to engage more egoistically oriented landholders and are only likely to appeal to those likely to already be conservation-minded. By understanding the frame in which PLC benefits are communicated, we can begin to understand the types of people who may be engaged by these messages, and who may not be. Results suggest that the framing of the communications for many schemes could be broadened to appeal to a more diverse group (and thus ultimately to a larger group) of landholders.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.envsci.2016.03.016
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
050205 Environmental Management
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085336

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