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The impact of insulin therapy and attitudes towards insulin intensification among adults with type 2 diabetes: A qualitative study

Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth, Browne, Jessica L. and Speight, Jane 2016, The impact of insulin therapy and attitudes towards insulin intensification among adults with type 2 diabetes: A qualitative study, Journal of diabetes and its complications, vol. 30, no. 6, pp. 1151-1157, doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2016.03.027.

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Title The impact of insulin therapy and attitudes towards insulin intensification among adults with type 2 diabetes: A qualitative study
Author(s) Holmes-Truscott, ElizabethORCID iD for Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0001-9139-4663
Browne, Jessica L.ORCID iD for Browne, Jessica L. orcid.org/0000-0001-7294-8114
Speight, JaneORCID iD for Speight, Jane orcid.org/0000-0002-1204-6896
Journal name Journal of diabetes and its complications
Volume number 30
Issue number 6
Start page 1151
End page 1157
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Atlanta, Ga.
Publication date 2016-08
ISSN 1873-460X
Keyword(s) insulin therapy
type 2 diabetes
psychological insulin resistance
treatment intensification
attitudes
Summary BACKGROUND: As type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a progressive chronic condition, regular clinical review and treatment intensification are critical for prevention of long-term complications. Our aim was to explore the personal impact of insulin therapy, both positive and negative consequences, and attitudes towards future insulin intensification. METHODS: Twenty face-to-face interviews were conducted, and transcripts were analysed using thematic inductive analysis. Eligible participants were adults with T2DM, using insulin injections for <4years. Participants were mostly men (n=13, 65%), (median (range)) aged 65 (43-76) years, living with T2DM for 11.5 (2-27) years. RESULTS: Five themes emerged regarding the consequences (positive and negative) of insulin therapy, including: physical impact, personal control, emotional well-being, freedom/flexibility, (concerns about) others' reactions. Increased inconvenience and the perceived seriousness of using fast-acting insulin were both reported as barriers to future insulin intensification, despite most participants being receptive to the idea of administering additional injections. CONCLUSIONS: Positive and negative experiences of insulin therapy were reported by adults with T2DM and most were receptive to insulin intensification despite reported barriers. These findings may inform clinical interactions with people with T2DM and interventions to promote receptiveness to insulin initiation and intensification.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2016.03.027
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085342

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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Created: Thu, 18 Aug 2016, 13:30:07 EST

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