The diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in Australian children: current paediatric practice and parent perspective

Efron, Daryl, Sciberras, Emma, Hiscock, Harriet, Jongeling, Brad, Lycett, Kate, Bisset, Matthew and Smith, Grant 2016, The diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in Australian children: current paediatric practice and parent perspective, Journal of paediatrics and child health, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 410-416, doi: 10.1111/jpc.13091.

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Title The diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in Australian children: current paediatric practice and parent perspective
Author(s) Efron, Daryl
Sciberras, EmmaORCID iD for Sciberras, Emma orcid.org/0000-0003-2812-303X
Hiscock, Harriet
Jongeling, Brad
Lycett, Kate
Bisset, Matthew
Smith, Grant
Journal name Journal of paediatrics and child health
Volume number 52
Issue number 4
Start page 410
End page 416
Total pages 7
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2016-04
ISSN 1034-4810
1440-1754
Keyword(s) ADHD
behavioural medicine
guideline adherence
paediatrics
quality of health care
Summary Aims In a sample of newly diagnosed children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the aims were to examine (1) paediatrician assessment and management practices; (2) previous assessments and interventions; (3) correspondence between parent-report and paediatrician identification of comorbidities; and (4) parent agreement with diagnosis of ADHD. Methods Design: cross-sectional, multi-site practice audit with questionnaires completed by paediatricians and parents at the point of ADHD diagnosis. Setting: private/public paediatric practices in Western Australia and Victoria, Australia. Main outcome measures: paediatricians: elements of assessment and management were indicated on a study-designed data form. Parents: ADHD symptoms and comorbidities were measured using the Conners 3 ADHD Index and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, respectively. Sleep problems, previous assessments and interventions, and agreement with ADHD diagnosis were measured by questionnaire. Results Twenty-four paediatricians participated, providing data on 137 patients (77% men, mean age 8.1 years). Parent and teacher questionnaires were used in 88% and 85% of assessments, respectively. Medication was prescribed in 75% of cases. Comorbidities were commonly diagnosed (70%); however, the proportion of patients identified by paediatricians with internalising problems (18%), externalising problems (15%) and sleep problems (4%) was less than by parent report (51%, 66% and 39%). One in seven parents did not agree with the diagnosis of ADHD. Conclusions Australian paediatric practice in relation to ADHD assessment is generally consistent with best practice guidelines; however, improvements are needed in relation to the routine use of questionnaires and the identification of comorbidities. A proportion of parents do not agree with the diagnosis of ADHD made by their paediatrician.
DOI 10.1111/jpc.13091
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
1114 Paediatrics And Reproductive Medicine
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085346

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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