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Is cost-related non-collection of prescriptions associated with a reduction in health? Findings from a large-scale longitudinal study of New Zealand adults

Jatrana, Santosh, Richardson, Ken, Norris, Pauline and Crampton, Peter 2015, Is cost-related non-collection of prescriptions associated with a reduction in health? Findings from a large-scale longitudinal study of New Zealand adults, BMJ open, vol. 5, no. 11, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-007781.

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Title Is cost-related non-collection of prescriptions associated with a reduction in health? Findings from a large-scale longitudinal study of New Zealand adults
Author(s) Jatrana, Santosh
Richardson, Ken
Norris, Pauline
Crampton, Peter
Journal name BMJ open
Volume number 5
Issue number 11
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BMJ Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) EPIDEMIOLOGY
PRIMARY CARE
PUBLIC HEALTH
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
SELF-RATED HEALTH
MEDICATION COSTS
DRUG
MEDICINES
OUTCOMES
INCOME
CARE
DEPRIVATION
POPULATION
INSURANCE
Summary OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether cost-related non-collection of prescription medication is associated with a decline in health. SETTINGS: New Zealand Survey of Family, Income and Employment (SoFIE)-Health. PARTICIPANTS: Data from 17 363 participants with at least two observations in three waves (2004-2005, 2006-2007, 2008-2009) of a panel study were analysed using fixed effects regression modelling. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-rated health (SRH), physical health (PCS) and mental health scores (MCS) were the health measures used in this study. RESULTS: After adjusting for time-varying confounders, non-collection of prescription items was associated with a 0.11 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.15) unit worsening in SRH, a 1.00 (95% CI 0.61 to 1.40) unit decline in PCS and a 1.69 (95% CI 1.19 to 2.18) unit decline in MCS. The interaction of the main exposure with gender was significant for SRH and MCS. Non-collection of prescription items was associated with a decline in SRH of 0.18 (95% CI 0.11 to 0.25) units for males and 0.08 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.13) units for females, and a decrease in MCS of 2.55 (95% CI 1.67 to 3.42) and 1.29 (95% CI 0.70 to 1.89) units for males and females, respectively. The interaction of the main exposure with age was significant for SRH. For respondents aged 15-24 and 25-64 years, non-collection of prescription items was associated with a decline in SRH of 0.12 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.21) and 0.12 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.17) units, respectively, but for respondents aged 65 years and over, non-collection of prescription items had no significant effect on SRH. CONCLUSION: Our results show that those who do not collect prescription medications because of cost have an increased risk of a subsequent decline in health.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-007781
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 940204 Public Services Policy Advice and Analysis
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, BMJ
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085399

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Alfred Deakin Research Institute
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