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Relationship obsessive-compulsive disorder: interference, symptoms, and maladaptive beliefs

Doron, Guy, Derby, Danny, Szepsenwol, Ohad, Nahaloni, Elad and Moulding, Richard 2016, Relationship obsessive-compulsive disorder: interference, symptoms, and maladaptive beliefs, Frontiers in psychiatry, vol. 7, Article number : 58, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2016.00058.

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Title Relationship obsessive-compulsive disorder: interference, symptoms, and maladaptive beliefs
Author(s) Doron, Guy
Derby, Danny
Szepsenwol, Ohad
Nahaloni, Elad
Moulding, RichardORCID iD for Moulding, Richard orcid.org/0000-0001-7779-3166
Journal name Frontiers in psychiatry
Volume number 7
Season Article number : 58
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2016-04
ISSN 1664-0640
Keyword(s) OCD and anxiety disorders
cognitive therapy
maladaptive beliefs
relationship obsessive–compulsive disorder (ROCD)
relationships
Summary BACKGROUND: Obsessive preoccupation, doubts, and compulsive behaviors focusing on one's romantic relationship and partner are receiving increasing clinical, theoretical, and empirical attention. Commonly referred to as relationship obsessive-compulsive disorder (ROCD), such symptoms have been linked with decreased relational and sexual functioning and lower mood, even after controlling for other obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms. To date, however, these symptoms have been studied in community samples alone. In the present study, we compared levels of interference, OCD, and mood symptoms between clinical participants with ROCD, OCD, and community controls. We also examined group differences in maladaptive beliefs previously linked with OCD and ROCD.

METHOD: Participants included 22 ROCD clients, 22 OCD clients, and 28 community controls. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview was used to attain clinical diagnoses of OCD and ROCD. The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale was used to evaluate primary-symptoms severity. All participants completed measures of symptoms and dysfunctional beliefs.

RESULTS: ROCD clients reported more severe ROCD symptoms than the OCD and control groups. ROCD and OCD clients did not differ in severity of their -primary-symptoms. ROCD clients scored higher than the other groups on maladaptive OCD-related and relationship-related beliefs. Finally, ROCD clients showed more severe depression symptoms than community controls.

CONCLUSION: ROCD is a disabling presentation of OCD that warrants research attention. Maladaptive OCD-related and relationship-related beliefs may be implicated in the development and maintenance of ROCD.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyt.2016.00058
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085451

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.