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Exploring the dietary patterns of young New Zealand women and associations with BMI and body fat

Schrijvers, Jenna K., McNaughton, Sarah A., Beck, Kathryn L. and Kruger, Rozanne 2016, Exploring the dietary patterns of young New Zealand women and associations with BMI and body fat, Nutrients, vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.3390/nu8080450.

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Title Exploring the dietary patterns of young New Zealand women and associations with BMI and body fat
Author(s) Schrijvers, Jenna K.
McNaughton, Sarah A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Beck, Kathryn L.
Kruger, Rozanne
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 8
Issue number 8
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) dietary assessment
dietary patterns
premenopausal women
food frequency questionnaire
Summary Examining dietary patterns provides an alternative approach to investigating dietary behaviors related to excess adiposity. The study aim was to investigate dietary patterns and body composition profiles of New Zealand European (NZE) women, participating in the women’s EXPLORE (Examining the Predictors Linking Obesity Related Elements) study. Post-menarche, pre-menopausal NZE women (16-45 years) (n = 231) completed a validated 220-item, self-administrated, semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated using measured height (cm) and weight (kg); body fat percentage (BF%) was measured using air displacement plethysmography (BodPod). Dietary patterns were identified using principal component factor analysis. Associations between dietary patterns, age, BMI and BF% were investigated. Four dietary patterns were identified: snacking; energy-dense meat; fruit and vegetable; healthy, which explained 6.9%, 6.8%, 5.6% and 4.8% of food intake variation, respectively. Age (p = 0.012) and BMI (p = 0.016) were positively associated with the “energy-dense meat” pattern. BF% (p = 0.016) was positively associated with the “energy-dense meat” pattern after adjusting for energy intake. The women following the identified dietary patterns had carbohydrate intakes below and saturated fat intakes above recommended guidelines. Dietary patterns in NZE women explain only some variations in body composition. Further research should examine other potential factors including physical activity and socioeconomic status.
Notes This article belongs to the Special Issue: Selected Papers from 2015 Joint Scientific Meeting of the Nutrition Society of New Zealand and Nutrition Society of Australia
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu8080450
Field of Research 111102 Dietetics and Nutrigenomics
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
Socio Economic Objective 920507 Women's Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085465

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.