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Providing mental health first aid in the workplace: a Delphi consensus study

Bovopoulos, Nataly, Jorm, Anthony F., Bond, Kathy S., LaMontagne, Anthony D., Reavley, Nicola J., Kelly, Claire M., Kitchener, Betty A. and Martin, A 2016, Providing mental health first aid in the workplace: a Delphi consensus study, BMC psychology, vol. 4, Article number : 41, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s40359-016-0148-x.

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Title Providing mental health first aid in the workplace: a Delphi consensus study
Author(s) Bovopoulos, Nataly
Jorm, Anthony F.
Bond, Kathy S.
LaMontagne, Anthony D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Reavley, Nicola J.
Kelly, Claire M.
Kitchener, Betty A.
Martin, A
Journal name BMC psychology
Volume number 4
Season Article number : 41
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2050-7283
Keyword(s) Delphi method
Mental health first aid
Workplace
Workplace guidelines
Summary BACKGROUND: Mental health problems are common in the workplace, but workers affected by such problems are not always well supported by managers and co-workers. Guidelines exist for the public on how to provide mental health first aid, but not specifically on how to tailor one's approach if the person of concern is a co-worker or employee. A Delphi consensus study was carried out to develop guidelines on additional considerations required when offering mental health first aid in a workplace context.

METHODS: A systematic search of websites, books and journal articles was conducted to develop a questionnaire with 246 items containing actions that someone may use to offer mental health first aid to a co-worker or employee. Three panels of experts from English-speaking countries were recruited (23 consumers, 26 managers and 38 workplace mental health professionals), who independently rated the items over three rounds for inclusion in the guidelines.

RESULTS: The retention rate of the expert panellists across the three rounds was 61.7 %. Of the 246 items, 201 items were agreed to be important or very important by at least 80 % of panellists. These 201 endorsed items included actions on how to approach and offer support to a co-worker, and additional considerations where the person assisting is a supervisor or manager, or is assisting in crisis situations such as acute distress.

CONCLUSIONS: The guidelines outline strategies for a worker to use when they are concerned about the mental health of a co-worker or employee. They will be used to inform future tailoring of Mental Health First Aid training when it is delivered in workplace settings and could influence organisational policies and procedures.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s40359-016-0148-x
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
Socio Economic Objective 920505 Occupational Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085474

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.