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The impact of characteristics of nurses' relationships with their supervisor, engagement and trust, on performance behaviours and intent to quit.

Rodwell, John, Mc Williams, John and Gulyas, Andre 2017, The impact of characteristics of nurses' relationships with their supervisor, engagement and trust, on performance behaviours and intent to quit., Journal of advanced nursing, vol. 73, no. 1, pp. 190-200, doi: 10.1111/jan.13102.

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Title The impact of characteristics of nurses' relationships with their supervisor, engagement and trust, on performance behaviours and intent to quit.
Author(s) Rodwell, John
Mc Williams, John
Gulyas, Andre
Journal name Journal of advanced nursing
Volume number 73
Issue number 1
Start page 190
End page 200
Total pages 11
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2017-01
ISSN 1365-2648
Keyword(s) engagement
in-role behaviour
organizational citizenship
relationship quality
social exchange
trust
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nursing
LEADER-MEMBER EXCHANGE
ORGANIZATIONAL CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIOR
PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTRACT
UNIT-LEADERSHIP
TURNOVER INTENTION
WORK ENGAGEMENT
SOCIAL-EXCHANGE
JOB-PERFORMANCE
IN-ROLE
COMMITMENT
Summary AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of characteristics of nurses' relationship quality with their manager on engagement and trust, onto in-role or discretionary behaviours and intent to quit. BACKGROUND: Nurses having a good relationship with their manager are seen as important, yet the mechanisms of how such relationships are beneficial, or which aspects of the relationship are important, is less clear. Two possible mechanisms are through the nurse being more engaged in work, or through building their trust in their employer. In turn, engagement and trust may impact in-role and discretionary behaviours as well as staff retention. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. METHOD: An online survey in 2013 of 459 nurses across Australia. RESULTS: Structural analyses indicated that the affect dimension of relationship quality was negatively related to engagement, whereas contribution and respect were positively related to engagement. The affect and respect aspects were positively related to trust. Engagement positively related to discretionary and in-role behaviours. Engagement and trust were negatively related to quit intention, as was the loyalty dimension of the nurses' relationship with their supervisor. However, perceptions of variability in their team's relationship quality with their leader was negatively related to trust and positively related to intent to quit. CONCLUSIONS: Nurse managers with a nuanced understanding of social exchange at work are likely to maintain more engaged, well-performing and stable nursing teams. In particular, a willingness by the supervisor to come to their nurses' defence and having a consistent standard of relationship quality across their nurses is likely to improve nurse retention.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/jan.13102
Field of Research 150311 Organisational Behaviour
1110 Nursing
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085477

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Department of Management
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