You are not logged in.

Can policy ameliorate socioeconomic inequities in obesity and obesity-related behaviours? A systematic review of the impact of universal policies on adults and children

Olstad, DL, Teychenne, M, Minaker, LM, Taber, DR, Raine, KD, Nykiforuk, CIJ and Ball, K 2016, Can policy ameliorate socioeconomic inequities in obesity and obesity-related behaviours? A systematic review of the impact of universal policies on adults and children, Obesity reviews, vol. 17, no. 12, pp. 1198-1217, doi: 10.1111/obr.12457.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Can policy ameliorate socioeconomic inequities in obesity and obesity-related behaviours? A systematic review of the impact of universal policies on adults and children
Author(s) Olstad, DL
Teychenne, MORCID iD for Teychenne, M orcid.org/0000-0002-7293-8255
Minaker, LM
Taber, DR
Raine, KD
Nykiforuk, CIJ
Ball, KORCID iD for Ball, K orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Journal name Obesity reviews
Volume number 17
Issue number 12
Start page 1198
End page 1217
Total pages 20
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2016-12
ISSN 1467-789X
Keyword(s) dietary behaviours
obesity
physical activity
policy
socioeconomic inequities
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Endocrinology & Metabolism
SOCIETAL-LEVEL INTERVENTIONS
DUTCH SCHOOLGRUITEN PROJECT
SCHOOL NUTRITION POLICY
BODY-MASS INDEX
VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION
SOCIAL INEQUALITIES
UNITED-STATES
ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGIES
CHILDHOOD OBESITY
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
Summary This systematic review examined the impact of universal policies on socioeconomic inequities in obesity, dietary and physical activity behaviours among adults and children. PRISMA-Equity guidelines were followed. Database searches spanned from 2004 to August 2015. Eligible studies assessed the impact of universal policies on anthropometric, dietary or physical activity-related outcomes in adults or children according to socioeconomic position. Thirty-six studies were included. Policies were classified as agentic, agento-structural or structural, and their impact on inequities was rated as positive, neutral, negative or mixed according to the dominant associations observed. Most policies had neutral impacts on obesity-related inequities regardless of whether they were agentic (60% neutral), agento-structural (68% neutral) or structural (67% neutral). The proportion of positive impacts was similar across policy types (10% agentic, 18% agento-structural and 11% structural), with some differences for negative impacts (30% agentic, 14% agento-structural and 22% structural). The majority of associations remained neutral when stratified by participant population, implementation level and socioeconomic position measures and by anthropometric and behavioural outcomes. Fiscal measures had consistently neutral or positive impacts on inequities. Findings suggest an important role for policy in addressing obesity in an equitable manner and strengthen the case for implementing a broad complement of policies spanning the agency-structure continuum.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/obr.12457
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, World Obesity
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085538

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 13 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 18 Aug 2016, 16:42:29 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.