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Translating an early childhood obesity prevention program for local community implementation: a case study of the Melbourne InFANT Program

Laws, R., Hesketh, K. D., Ball, K., Cooper, C., Vrljic, K. and Campbell, K. J. 2016, Translating an early childhood obesity prevention program for local community implementation: a case study of the Melbourne InFANT Program, BMC public health, vol. 16, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-3361-x.

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Title Translating an early childhood obesity prevention program for local community implementation: a case study of the Melbourne InFANT Program
Author(s) Laws, R.ORCID iD for Laws, R. orcid.org/0000-0003-4328-1116
Hesketh, K. D.ORCID iD for Hesketh, K. D. orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Ball, K.ORCID iD for Ball, K. orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Cooper, C.
Vrljic, K.
Campbell, K. J.ORCID iD for Campbell, K. J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 16
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-08-08
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Children
Dissemination
Implementation
Infants
Obesity prevention
Research translation
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
HEALTH-PROMOTION INTERVENTION
NUTRITION TRIAL INFANT
EXTERNAL VALIDITY
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
RANDOMIZED-TRIAL
RISK BEHAVIORS
DIET QUALITY
FIDELITY
POPULATION
Summary BACKGROUND: While there is a growing interest in the field of research translation, there are few published examples of public health interventions that have been effectively scaled up and implemented in the community. This paper provides a case study of the community-wide implementation of the Melbourne Infant, Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT), an obesity prevention program for parents with infants aged 3-18 months. The study explored key factors influencing the translation of the Program into routine practice and the respective role of policy makers, researchers and implementers.
METHODS: Case studies were conducted of five of the eight prevention areas in Victoria, Australia who implemented the Program. Cases were selected on the basis of having implemented the Program for 6 months or more. Data were collected from January to June 2015 and included 18 individual interviews, one focus group and observation of two meetings. A total of 28 individuals, including research staff (n = 4), policy makers (n = 2) and implementers (n = 22), contributed to the data collected. Thematic analysis was conducted using cross case comparisons and key themes were verified through member checking.
RESULTS: Key facilitators of implementation included availability of a pre-packaged evidence based program addressing a community need, along with support and training provided by research staff to local implementers. Partnerships between researchers and policy makers facilitated initial program adoption, while local partnerships supported community implementation. Community partnerships were facilitated by local coordinators through alignment of program goals with existing policies and services. Workforce capacity for program delivery and administration was a challenge, largely overcome by embedding the Program into existing roles. Adapting the Program to fit local circumstance was critical for feasible and sustainable delivery, however balancing this with program fidelity was a critical issue. The lack of ongoing funding to support translation activities was a barrier for researchers continued involvement in community implementation.
CONCLUSION: Policy makers, researchers and practitioners have important and complementary roles to play in supporting the translation of effective research interventions into practice. New avenues need to be explored to strengthen partnerships between researchers and end users to support the integration of effective public health research interventions into practice.
Notes Article number: 748
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3361-x
Field of Research 111704 Community Child Health
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Author(s)
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085541

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.