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Mating success and body condition not related to foraging specializations in male fur seals

Kernaléguen, L., Cherel, Y., Guinet, C. and Arnould, J.P.Y. 2016, Mating success and body condition not related to foraging specializations in male fur seals, Royal Society open science, vol. 3, no. 7, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1098/rsos.160143.

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Title Mating success and body condition not related to foraging specializations in male fur seals
Author(s) Kernaléguen, L.
Cherel, Y.
Guinet, C.
Arnould, J.P.Y.ORCID iD for Arnould, J.P.Y. orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Journal name Royal Society open science
Volume number 3
Issue number 7
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-07-06
ISSN 2054-5703
Keyword(s) Arctocephalus
diet
fitness payoff
reproductive success
stable isotopes
territorial males
Summary Individual specialization is widespread among wild populations. While its fitness consequences are central in predicting the ecological and evolutionary trajectories of populations, they remain poorly understood. Long-term individual foraging specializations occur in male Antarctic (Arctocephalus gazella) and Australian (A. pusillus doriferus) fur seals. Strong selective pressure is expected in these highly dimorphic and polygynous species, raising the question of the fitness payoffs associated with different foraging strategies. We investigated the relationship between individual isotopic niche (a proxy of foraging specialization), body size and condition, and an index of reproductive success (harem size) in territorial males. Individuals varied greatly in their skin and fur isotopic values reflecting a range of foraging strategies within the two populations. However, in both species, isotopic niche was not correlated to body size, condition or mating success (R (2)/ρ < 0.06). Furthermore, no foraging niche was predominant in either species, which would have indicated a substantial long-term fitness benefit of a particular strategy via a higher survival rate. These results suggest that the fitness consequences of a foraging strategy depend not only on the quality of prey and feeding habitat but also on an individual's hunting efficiency and skills.
Language eng
DOI 10.1098/rsos.160143
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085546

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.