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Epidemiological and evolutionary inference of the transmission network of the 2014 highly pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N2 outbreak in British Columbia, Canada

Xu, Wanhong, Berhane, Yohannes, Dubé, Caroline, Liang, Binhua, Pasick, John, VanDomselaar, Gary and Alexandersen, Soren 2016, Epidemiological and evolutionary inference of the transmission network of the 2014 highly pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N2 outbreak in British Columbia, Canada, Scientific reports, vol. 6, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1038/srep30858.

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Title Epidemiological and evolutionary inference of the transmission network of the 2014 highly pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N2 outbreak in British Columbia, Canada
Author(s) Xu, Wanhong
Berhane, Yohannes
Dubé, Caroline
Liang, Binhua
Pasick, John
VanDomselaar, Gary
Alexandersen, SorenORCID iD for Alexandersen, Soren orcid.org/0000-0002-5039-3178
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 6
Article ID 30858
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) influenza virus
phylogeny
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
Summary The first North American outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) involving a virus of Eurasian A/goose/Guangdong/1/1996 (H5N1) lineage began in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada in late November 2014. A total of 11 commercial and 1 non-commercial (backyard) operations were infected before the outbreak was terminated. Control measures included movement restrictions that were placed on a total of 404 individual premises, 150 of which were located within a 3 km radius of an infected premise(s) (IP). A complete epidemiological investigation revealed that the source of this HPAI H5N2 virus for 4 of the commercial IPs and the single non-commercial IP likely involved indirect contact with wild birds. Three IPs were associated with the movement of birds or service providers and localized/environmental spread was suspected as the source of infection for the remaining 4 IPs. Viral phylogenies, as determined by Bayesian Inference and Maximum Likelihood methods, were used to validate the epidemiologically inferred transmission network. The phylogenetic clustering of concatenated viral genomes and the median-joining phylogenetic network of the viruses supported, for the most part, the transmission network that was inferred by the epidemiologic analysis.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/srep30858
Field of Research 070712 Veterinary Virology
Socio Economic Objective 960310 Global Effects of Climate Change and Variability (excl. Australia
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085565

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Created: Fri, 19 Aug 2016, 14:45:15 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.