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Early origins of mental disorder - risk factors in the perinatal and infant period

Newman, Louise, Judd, Fiona, Olsson, Craig A., Castle, David, Bousman, Chad, Sheehan, Penelope, Pantelis, Christos, Craig, Jeffrey M., Komiti, Angela and Everall, Ian 2016, Early origins of mental disorder - risk factors in the perinatal and infant period, BMC psychiatry, vol. 16, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/s12888-016-0982-7.

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Title Early origins of mental disorder - risk factors in the perinatal and infant period
Author(s) Newman, Louise
Judd, Fiona
Olsson, Craig A.ORCID iD for Olsson, Craig A. orcid.org/0000-0002-5927-2014
Castle, David
Bousman, Chad
Sheehan, Penelope
Pantelis, Christos
Craig, Jeffrey M.
Komiti, Angela
Everall, Ian
Journal name BMC psychiatry
Volume number 16
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1471-244X
Keyword(s) attachment
babyhood
neurobiology
pregnancy
social and emotional development
Summary BACKGROUND: There is increasing understanding of the significance of early neurodevelopment in establishing risk for the range of mental disorders. Models of the early aetiology of mental disorders are complex with a range of potential factors from genetic and epigenetic to environmental influencing neurological and psychological development. Whilst the mechanisms are not fully understood, this paper provides an overview of potential biological and neurobiological factors that might be involved.

METHOD: An aetiological model is presented and discussed. The discussion includes a range of risk factors for mental disorder. Maternal anxiety disorder is presented and reviewed as an example of the interaction of placental, epigenetic and early parenting factors elevating risk of poor neonatal outcome.

RESULTS: Available evidence points to the importance of in-utero influences as well as the role of early attachment and emotional care. Transgenerational mechanisms such as the impact of maternal mental disorder on foetal development are important models for examination of early risk. Maternal anxiety, as an example, is a significant risk factor for compromised mental health.

CONCLUSIONS: Development of models for understanding the early origins of mental disorder is an important step in elaborating risk reduction strategies. Comprehensive early identification of risk raises the possibility of preventive interventions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0982-7
Field of Research 110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085581

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.