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The effect of working on-call on stress physiology and sleep: a systematic review

Hall, Sarah J., Ferguson, Sally A., Turner, Anne I., Robertson, Samuel J., Vincent, Grace E. and Aisbett, Brad 2016, The effect of working on-call on stress physiology and sleep: a systematic review, Sleep medicine reviews, In Press, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1016/j.smrv.2016.06.001.

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Title The effect of working on-call on stress physiology and sleep: a systematic review
Author(s) Hall, Sarah J.
Ferguson, Sally A.
Turner, Anne I.
Robertson, Samuel J.
Vincent, Grace E.
Aisbett, Brad
Journal name Sleep medicine reviews
Season In Press
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-06-11
ISSN 1087-0792
1532-2955
Keyword(s) on-call
standby
sleep quality
sleep quantity
hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal axis
cortisol
sympatho-adrenal medullary system
sleep
Summary On-call work is becoming an increasingly common work pattern, yet the human impacts of this type of work are not well established. Given the likelihood of calls to occur outside regular work hours, it is important to consider the potential impact of working on-call on stress physiology and sleep. The aims of this review were to collate and evaluate evidence on the effects of working on-call from home on stress physiology and sleep. A systematic search of Ebsco Host, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus and ScienceDirect was conducted. Search terms included: on-call, on call, standby, sleep, cortisol, heart rate, adrenaline, noradrenaline, nor-adrenaline, epinephrine, norepinephrine, nor-epinephrine, salivary alpha amylase and alpha amylase. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria, with only one study investigating the effect of working on-call from home on stress physiology. All eight studies investigated the effect of working on-call from home on sleep. Working on-call from home appears to adversely affect sleep quantity, and in most cases, sleep quality. However, studies did not differentiate between night's on-call from home with and without calls. Data examining the effect of working on-call from home on stress physiology were not sufficient to draw meaningful conclusions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.smrv.2016.06.001
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085587

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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