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Motivational drive and alprazolam misuse: a recipe for aggression?

Albrecht, Bonnie, Staiger, Petra K., Hall, Kate, Kambouropoulos, Nicolas and Best, David 2016, Motivational drive and alprazolam misuse: a recipe for aggression?, Psychiatry research, vol. 240, pp. 381-389, doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.04.040.

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Title Motivational drive and alprazolam misuse: a recipe for aggression?
Author(s) Albrecht, Bonnie
Staiger, Petra K.
Hall, Kate
Kambouropoulos, Nicolas
Best, David
Journal name Psychiatry research
Volume number 240
Start page 381
End page 389
Total pages 9
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-06-30
ISSN 0165-1781
1872-7123
Keyword(s) Aggressive behaviour
Benzodiazepines
Reinforcement sensitivity theory
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression
Alprazolam
Drive
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Substance-Related Disorders
Young Adult
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
BEHAVIORAL-APPROACH SYSTEM
PHYSICAL AGGRESSION
DISTINGUISHING BIS
DIAZEPAM VALIUM
PERSONALITY
BIS/BAS
ANXIETY
DRUGS
ANGER
Summary Benzodiazepine-related aggression has received insufficient research attention, in particular little is known about the motivational factors which may contribute to the development of this paradoxical response. The revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory provides a theoretical framework from which to understand the relevant underlying motivational processes. The current study aimed to identify the role of approach and avoidance motivational tendencies in the occurrence of benzodiazepine-related aggression. Data regarding benzodiazepine and other substance use, approach and avoidance motivation, and general and physical aggressive behaviour were collected via self-report questionnaires. Participants were a convenience sample (n=204) who reported using benzodiazepines in the previous year. Participants were primarily male (62.7%), aged 18-51 years old. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that general and physical aggression were predicted by alprazolam use and Drive, a facet of approach motivation. Overall, lower diazepam use significantly predicted higher levels of general aggression. However, when diazepam-preferring participants were examined in isolation of the larger sample (23.5% of sample), problematic (dependent) diazepam use was associated with greater aggression scores, as was dependence risk for alprazolam-preferring participants (39.7% of sample). The findings highlight the importance of motivational factors and benzodiazepine use patterns in understanding benzodiazepine-related aggression, with implications for violent offender rehabilitation.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.04.040
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920414 Substance Abuse
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085597

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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