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Obesity and increased burden of hip and knee joint disease in Australia: results from a national survey

Ackerman, Ilana N. and Osborne, Richard H. 2012, Obesity and increased burden of hip and knee joint disease in Australia: results from a national survey, BMC Musculoskeletal disorders, vol. 13, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1186/1471-2474-13-254.

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Title Obesity and increased burden of hip and knee joint disease in Australia: results from a national survey
Author(s) Ackerman, Ilana N.
Osborne, Richard H.ORCID iD for Osborne, Richard H. orcid.org/0000-0002-9081-2699
Journal name BMC Musculoskeletal disorders
Volume number 13
Article ID 254
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2012-12-20
ISSN 1471-2474
Keyword(s) Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthralgia
Australia
Biomechanical Phenomena
Body Mass Index
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Status
Health Surveys
Hip Joint
Humans
Knee Joint
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity
Odds Ratio
Osteoarthritis, Hip
Osteoarthritis, Knee
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Risk Assessment
Risk Factors
Severity of Illness Index
Summary BACKGROUND: Research involving more representative samples is needed to extend our understanding of the broader impact of obesity in hip or knee joint disease (arthritis and OA) beyond clinical settings. Although population-based research has been conducted in the United States, how these findings translate to other countries is unclear. Using a national approach, this study explored associations between obesity and the burden of hip and knee joint disease in Australia (in terms of prevalence, pain, stiffness, function, Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and disease severity).
METHODS: A random sample of 5000 Australians (≥ 39 years) from the federal electoral roll was invited to complete a mailed questionnaire to identify doctor-diagnosed hip arthritis, hip OA, knee arthritis and knee OA and evaluate the burden of these conditions. Validated questionnaires included the WOMAC Index, Assessment of Quality of Life instrument and Multi-Attribute Prioritisation Tool. Body Mass Index (BMI) was classified into underweight/normal weight (≤ 24.99 kg/m2), overweight (25-29.99) or obese (≥ 30). Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate odds of arthritis and OA, with demographic and socioeconomic variables included in the models. Associations between BMI and other variables were investigated using analysis of covariance, with adjustment for age and sex.
RESULTS: Data were available from 1,157 participants (23%). Overweight participants had increased odds of knee arthritis (adjusted OR (AOR) 1.87, 95%CI 1.14-3.07) and knee OA (AOR 2.11, 95%CI 1.07-4.15). Obesity was associated with higher prevalence of hip arthritis (AOR 2.18, 95%CI 1.17-4.06), knee arthritis (AOR 5.47, 95%CI 3.35-8.95) and knee OA (AOR 7.35, 95%CI 3.85-14.02). Of those with arthritis or OA, obese individuals reported more pain (for hip arthritis, hip OA and knee OA), greater stiffness (for hip arthritis, knee arthritis and knee OA), worse function (all diagnoses), lower HRQoL (for hip arthritis and hip OA) and greater disease severity (all diagnoses).
CONCLUSIONS: This national study has demonstrated that the odds of arthritis and OA was up to 7 times higher for obese individuals, compared with those classified as underweight/normal weight. Concurrent obesity and joint disease had a marked impact on several key aspects of wellbeing, highlighting the need for public health interventions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2474-13-254
Field of Research 111102 Dietetics and Nutrigenomics
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, Ackerman and Osborne
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085614

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.