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Critical success factors for implementing risk management systems in developing countries

Hosseini, M. Reza, Chileshe, Nicholas, Jepson, Jacqueline and Arashpour, Mehrdad 2016, Critical success factors for implementing risk management systems in developing countries, Construction economics and building, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 18-32, doi: 10.5130/AJCEB.v16i1.4651.

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Title Critical success factors for implementing risk management systems in developing countries
Author(s) Hosseini, M. RezaORCID iD for Hosseini, M. Reza orcid.org/0000-0001-8675-736X
Chileshe, Nicholas
Jepson, Jacqueline
Arashpour, Mehrdad
Journal name Construction economics and building
Volume number 16
Issue number 1
Start page 18
End page 32
Total pages 15
Publisher UTS ePRESS (University of Technology Sydney)
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Publication date 2016-03-08
ISSN 2204-9029
Keyword(s) critical success factors
risk management
the construction industry
developing countries
Summary A review of published studies on risk management in developing countries reveals that critical success factors for implementing risk management has remained an under-researched area of investigation. This paper is aimed at investigating the perceptions of construction professionals concerning the critical success factors (CSFs) for implementation of risk management systems (IRMS). Survey data was collected from 87 construction professionals from the Iranian construction industry as a developing country. The results indicate that four factors are regarded as highly critical: ‘support from managers’, ‘inclusion of risk management in construction education and training courses for construction practitioners’, ‘attempting to deliver projects systematically’, and ‘awareness and knowledge of the process for implementing risk management’. Assessing the associations among CSFs also highlighted the crucial role of enhancing the effectiveness of knowledge management practices in construction organisations. Study also revealed that parties involved in projects do not agree on the level of importance of CSFs for implementing risk management in developing countries. This study contributes to practice and research in several ways. For practice, it increases understanding of how closely knowledge management is associated with the implementation of risk management systems in developing countries. For research, the findings would encourage construction practitioners to support effective knowledge management as a precursor to higher levels of risk management implementation on construction projects.
Language eng
DOI 10.5130/AJCEB.v16i1.4651
Field of Research 120201 Building Construction Management and Project Planning
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085721

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.