Openly accessible

Germination ecology and seed dispersal of a critically endangered plant: a case study of Pomaderris vacciniifolia (Round-leaf Pomaderris)

Patykowski, John, Dell, Matthew and Gibson, Maria 2016, Germination ecology and seed dispersal of a critically endangered plant: a case study of Pomaderris vacciniifolia (Round-leaf Pomaderris), PLoS One, vol. 11, no. 8, Article number: e0161665, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0161665.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
gibson-germinationecology-2016.pdf Published version application/pdf 606.79KB 88

Title Germination ecology and seed dispersal of a critically endangered plant: a case study of Pomaderris vacciniifolia (Round-leaf Pomaderris)
Formatted title Germination ecology and seed dispersal of a critically endangered plant: a case study of Pomaderris vacciniifolia (Round-leaf Pomaderris)
Author(s) Patykowski, John
Dell, Matthew
Gibson, Maria
Journal name PLoS One
Volume number 11
Issue number 8
Season Article number: e0161665
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2016-08-24
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) seeds
seed germination
heat treatment
soil ecology
seed coat
conservation science
wildfires
population ecology
Summary Change in ecosystem disturbance regimes from human land-use poses a worldwide problem for management of rare species. Two important types of disturbance influencing the persistence of species in Australian ecosystems are habitat fragmentation and fire. In this study, seed dispersal and the germination ecology of Pomaderris vacciniifolia-a critically endangered, rare endemic Australian shrub-were examined to identify likely influences of fire and fragmentation on the decline of populations. The response of seed germination to simulated effects of wildfire and canopy openings was investigated, as was the unaided dispersal capability of seeds from parent plants. A significant increase in germination rate was observed following 100°C heat treatment to seeds, while smoke and light exposure had little influence. Seed imbibition was strongly influenced by heat treatment. The findings indicate a likely positive post-fire germination response, with implications for recruitment success determined by moisture availability following fire. Unaided seed dispersal was limited, which partly explains the apparent decline of populations. Understanding disturbance requirements for threatened species, and subsequent management of landscapes for disturbance, will aid conservation of rare species throughout the world.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0161665
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
050102 Ecosystem Function
060703 Plant Developmental and Reproductive Biology
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085780

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 281 Abstract Views, 88 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 31 Aug 2016, 08:36:17 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.