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Post-socialist femininity unleashed/restrained: reconfigurations of gender in Chinese television dramas

Chen, Shih-Wen and Lau, Sin Wen 2016, Post-socialist femininity unleashed/restrained: reconfigurations of gender in Chinese television dramas, M/C journal, vol. 19, no. 4.

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Title Post-socialist femininity unleashed/restrained: reconfigurations of gender in Chinese television dramas
Author(s) Chen, Shih-WenORCID iD for Chen, Shih-Wen orcid.org/0000-0002-4110-7985
Lau, Sin Wen
Journal name M/C journal
Volume number 19
Issue number 4
Publisher M/C - Media and Culture
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld.
Publication date 2016-08
ISSN 1441-2616
Keyword(s) China
gender
television studies
femininity
Summary In post-socialist China, gender norms are marked by rising divorce rates (Kleinman et al.), shifting attitudes towards sex (Farrer; Yan), and a growing commercialisation of sex (Zheng). These phenomena have been understood as indicative of market reforms unhinging past gender norms. In the socialist period, the radical politics of the time moulded women as gender neutral even as state policies emphasised their feminine roles in maintaining marital harmony and stability(Evans). These ideas around domesticity bear strong resemblance to pre-socialist understandings of womanhood and family that anchored Chinese society before the Communists took power in 1949. In this pre-socialist understanding, women were categorised into a hierarchy that defined their rights as wives, mothers, concubines, and servants (Ebrey and Watson; Wolf and Witke). Women who transgressed these categories were regarded as potentially dangerous and powerfulenough to break up families and shake the foundations of Chinese society (Ahern). This paper explores the extent to which understandings of Chinese femininity have been reconfigured in the context of China’s post-1979 development, particularly after the 2000s.
Language eng
Field of Research 200202 Asian Cultural Studies
190204 Film and Television
200205 Culture, Gender, Sexuality
1902 Film, Television And Digital Media
2001 Communication And Media Studies
2002 Cultural Studies
Socio Economic Objective 950204 The Media
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085784

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.