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Characterising the extent of misreporting of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes using the Australian Health Survey

Peterson, Karen Louise, Jacobs, Jane Philippa, Allender, Steven, Alston, Laura Veronica and Nichols, Melanie 2016, Characterising the extent of misreporting of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes using the Australian Health Survey, BMC public health, vol. 16, Article number: 695, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-3389-y.

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Title Characterising the extent of misreporting of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes using the Australian Health Survey
Author(s) Peterson, Karen LouiseORCID iD for Peterson, Karen Louise orcid.org/0000-0003-2822-9926
Jacobs, Jane Philippa
Allender, StevenORCID iD for Allender, Steven orcid.org/0000-0002-4842-3294
Alston, Laura VeronicaORCID iD for Alston, Laura Veronica orcid.org/0000-0002-4551-8845
Nichols, MelanieORCID iD for Nichols, Melanie orcid.org/0000-0002-7834-5899
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 16
Season Article number: 695
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-08-02
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) cardiovascular disease/epidemiology
diabetes mellitus/epidemiology
health surveys
hypertension/epidemiology
hypercholesterolemia/epidemiology
logistic models
multivariate analysis
odds ratio
self disclosure
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
SELF-REPORTED HYPERTENSION
RISK-FACTOR SURVEY
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
YOUNG-ADULTS
VALIDITY
POPULATION
AGREEMENT
ACCURACY
CARE
Summary BACKGROUND: Measuring and monitoring the true prevalence of risk factors for chronic conditions is essential for evidence-based policy and health service planning. Understanding the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Australia relies heavily on self-report measures from surveys, such as the triennial National Health Survey. However, international evidence suggests that self-reported data may substantially underestimate actual risk factor prevalence. This study sought to characterise the extent of misreporting in a large, nationally-representative health survey that included objective measures of clinical risk factors for CVD.

METHODS: This study employed a cross-sectional analysis of 7269 adults aged 18 years and over who provided fasting blood samples as part of the 2011-12 Australian Health Survey. Self-reported prevalence of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes was compared to measured prevalence, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses identified socio-demographic characteristics associated with underreporting for each risk factor.

RESULTS: Approximately 16 % of the total sample underreported high blood pressure (measured to be at high risk but didn't report a diagnosis), 33 % underreported high cholesterol, and 1.3 % underreported diabetes. Among those measured to be at high risk, 68 % did not report a diagnosis for high blood pressure, nor did 89 % of people with high cholesterol and 29 % of people with high fasting plasma glucose. Younger age was associated with underreporting high blood pressure and high cholesterol, while lower area-level disadvantage and higher income were associated with underreporting diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS: Underreporting has important implications for CVD risk factor surveillance, policy planning and decisions, and clinical best-practice guidelines. This analysis highlights concerns about the reach of primary prevention efforts in certain groups and implications for patients who may be unaware of their disease risk status.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3389-y
Field of Research 111711 Health Information Systems (incl Surveillance)
111706 Epidemiology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920408 Health Status (e.g. Indicators of Well-Being)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085785

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.