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Persistent and contemporaneous effects of job stressors on mental health: a study testing multiple analytic approaches across 13 waves of annually collected cohort data

Milner, Allison, Aitken, Zoe, Kavanagh, Anne, LaMontagne, Anthony D. and Petrie, Dennis 2016, Persistent and contemporaneous effects of job stressors on mental health: a study testing multiple analytic approaches across 13 waves of annually collected cohort data, Occupational and environmental medicine, vol. 73, no. 11, pp. 787-793, doi: 10.1136/oemed-2016-103762.

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Title Persistent and contemporaneous effects of job stressors on mental health: a study testing multiple analytic approaches across 13 waves of annually collected cohort data
Author(s) Milner, Allison
Aitken, Zoe
Kavanagh, Anne
LaMontagne, Anthony D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Petrie, Dennis
Journal name Occupational and environmental medicine
Volume number 73
Issue number 11
Start page 787
End page 793
Total pages 7
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-11
ISSN 1351-0711
1470-7926
Keyword(s) lagged effects
psychosocial job stressors
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
RECIPROCAL RELATIONSHIPS
WORKING AUSTRALIANS
HILDA SURVEY
PANEL-DATA
DEPRESSION
DYNAMICS
DEMANDS
MODEL
RISK
Summary OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the extent that psychosocial job stressors had lasting effects on a scaled measure of mental health. We applied econometric approaches to a longitudinal cohort to: (1) control for unmeasured individual effects; (2) assess the role of prior (lagged) exposures of job stressors on mental health and (3) the persistence of mental health.

METHODS: We used a panel study with 13 annual waves and applied fixed-effects, first-difference and fixed-effects Arellano-Bond models. The Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Health Component Summary score was the outcome variable and the key exposures included: job control, job demands, job insecurity and fairness of pay.

RESULTS: Results from the Arellano-Bond models suggest that greater fairness of pay (β-coefficient 0.34, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.45), job control (β-coefficient 0.15, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.20) and job security (β-coefficient 0.37, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.42) were contemporaneously associated with better mental health. Similar results were found for the fixed-effects and first-difference models. The Arellano-Bond model also showed persistent effects of individual mental health, whereby individuals' previous reports of mental health were related to their reporting in subsequent waves. The estimated long-run impact of job demands on mental health increased after accounting for time-related dynamics, while there were more minimal impacts for the other job stressor variables.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that the majority of the effects of psychosocial job stressors on a scaled measure of mental health are contemporaneous except for job demands where accounting for the lagged dynamics was important.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/oemed-2016-103762
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, BMJ
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085789

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Population Health
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