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What does VET bring to higher education that is distinctive?

Hodge, Steven, Rawolle, Shaun, Webb, Sue, Bathmaker, Ann-Marie and Gale, Trevor 2016, What does VET bring to higher education that is distinctive?, in AVETRA 2016 : Proceedings of the 19th Annual Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association Conference, Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association, Crows Nest, N.S.W., pp. 1-13.

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Title What does VET bring to higher education that is distinctive?
Author(s) Hodge, Steven
Rawolle, ShaunORCID iD for Rawolle, Shaun orcid.org/0000-0002-7514-0660
Webb, Sue
Bathmaker, Ann-Marie
Gale, TrevorORCID iD for Gale, Trevor orcid.org/0000-0003-3927-9267
Conference name Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association. Annual Conference (19th : 2016 : Sydney, New South Wales)
Conference location Sydney, New South Wales
Conference dates 20 - 22 Apr. 2016
Title of proceedings AVETRA 2016 : Proceedings of the 19th Annual Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2016
Conference series Annual Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association Conference
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association
Place of publication Crows Nest, N.S.W.
Keyword(s) vocational education and training
higher education
Bourdieu
Bernstein
distinction
taste
message systems
knowledge codes
Summary Australian higher education is in a state of flux. One sign of this flux is the entry of new providers, including those with a track record in VET. Are these providers offering similar qualifications to universities or do they bring something new and distinctive? This paper draws on Pierre Bourdieu’s theory of distinction to argue that the entry of qualifications by new providers trouble some of the boundaries between the VET and higher education fields. VET provider degrees emerge as a new point of distinction in the higher education field, offering benefits that resonate with changes in the market for degrees. VET provider degrees potentially alter the structure of the higher education field, disturbing the established order and changing the rules of the game. Basil Bernstein’s concept of ‘message systems’ is drawn on to nuance the theory of distinction in the context of the Australian tertiary landscape. Attention is thus drawn to messages associated with teaching, curriculum and assessment in VET providers that help us to examine the action of these providers in reconfiguring distinction. The analysis presented here hints at a redefinition of what makes a degree distinctive.
ISBN 9780980527537
Language eng
Field of Research 130103 Higher Education
130108 Technical, Further and Workplace Education
Socio Economic Objective 930501 Education and Training Systems Policies and Development
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085793

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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