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Seasonal drivers of the epidemiology of arthropod-borne viruses in Australia

Geoghegan, Jemma L., Walker, Peter J., Duchemin, Jean-Bernard, Jeanne, Isabelle and Holmes, Edward C. 2014, Seasonal drivers of the epidemiology of arthropod-borne viruses in Australia, PLoS neglected tropical diseases, vol. 8, no. 11, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003325.

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Title Seasonal drivers of the epidemiology of arthropod-borne viruses in Australia
Author(s) Geoghegan, Jemma L.
Walker, Peter J.
Duchemin, Jean-Bernard
Jeanne, IsabelleORCID iD for Jeanne, Isabelle orcid.org/0000-0002-5065-9685
Holmes, Edward C.
Contributor(s) Kittayapong, P
Journal name PLoS neglected tropical diseases
Volume number 8
Issue number 11
Article ID e3325
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2014-11
ISSN 1935-2735
Summary Arthropod-borne viruses are a major cause of emerging disease with significant public health and economic impacts. However, the factors that determine their activity and seasonality are not well understood. In Australia, a network of sentinel cattle herds is used to monitor the distribution of several such viruses and to define virus-free regions. Herein, we utilize these serological data to describe the seasonality, and its drivers, of three economically important animal arboviruses: bluetongue virus, Akabane virus and bovine ephemeral fever virus. Through epidemiological time-series analyses of sero-surveillance data of 180 sentinel herds between 2004–2012, we compared seasonal parameters across latitudes, ranging from the tropical north (−10°S) to the more temperate south (−40°S). This analysis revealed marked differences in seasonality between distinct geographic regions and climates: seasonality was most pronounced in southern regions and gradually decreased as latitude decreased toward the Equator. Further, we show that both the timing of epidemics and the average number of seroconversions have a strong geographical component, which likely reflect patterns of vector abundance through co-varying climatic factors, especially temperature and rainfall. Notably, despite their differences in biology, including insect vector species, all three viruses exhibited very similar seasonality. By revealing the factors that shape spatial and temporal distributions, our study provides a more complete understanding of arbovirus seasonality that will enable better risk predictions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003325
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
06 Biological Sciences
11 Medical And Health Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920109 Infectious Diseases
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085832

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.