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Multiple dispersal vectors drive range expansion in an invasive marine species

Richardson, Mark, Sherman, Craig, Lee, Randall S., Bott, Nathan J. and Hirst, Alastair J. 2016, Multiple dispersal vectors drive range expansion in an invasive marine species, Molecular ecology, vol. 25, no. 20, pp. 5001-5014, doi: 10.1111/mec.13817.

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Title Multiple dispersal vectors drive range expansion in an invasive marine species
Author(s) Richardson, MarkORCID iD for Richardson, Mark orcid.org/0000-0002-1650-0064
Sherman, CraigORCID iD for Sherman, Craig orcid.org/0000-0003-2099-0462
Lee, Randall S.
Bott, Nathan J.
Hirst, Alastair J.
Journal name Molecular ecology
Volume number 25
Issue number 20
Start page 5001
End page 5014
Total pages 14
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2016-10
ISSN 1365-294X
1365-294X
Keyword(s) eDNA
hydrodynamic and dispersion modelling
invasive species
larval dispersal
population genetics
range expansion
environmental DNA
Summary The establishment and subsequent spread of invasive species is widely recognised as one of the most threatening processes contributing to global biodiversity loss. This is especially true for marine and estuarine ecosystems, which have experienced significant increases in the number of invasive species with the increase in global maritime trade. Understanding the rate and mechanisms of range expansion is therefore of significant interest to ecologists and conservation managers alike. Using a combination of population genetic surveys, eDNA plankton sampling and hydrodynamic modelling we examined the patterns of introduction of the predatory Northern Pacific seastar (Asterias amurensis) and pathways of secondary spread within southeast Australia. Genetic surveys across the invasive range reveal some genetic divergence between the two main invasive regions and no evidence of ongoing gene flow; a pattern that is consistent with the establishment of the second invasive region via a human-mediated translocation event. In contrast hydrodynamic modelling combined with eDNA plankton sampling demonstrated that the establishment of range expansion populations within a region is consistent with natural larval dispersal and recruitment. Our results suggest that both anthropogenic and natural dispersal vectors have played an important role in the range expansion of this species in Australia. The multiple modes of spread combined with high levels of fecundity and a long larval duration in A. amurensis suggests it is likely to continue its range expansion and significantly impact Australian marine ecosystems.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/mec.13817
Field of Research 050103 Invasive Species Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, John Wiley & Sons
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2017-11-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085843

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.