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Dietary fiber and bacterial SCFA enhance oral tolerance and protect against food allergy through diverse cellular pathways

Tan, Jian, McKenzie, Craig, Vuillermin, Peter J., Goverse, Gera, Vinuesa, Carola G., Mebius, Reina E., Macia, Laurence and Mackay, Charles 2016, Dietary fiber and bacterial SCFA enhance oral tolerance and protect against food allergy through diverse cellular pathways, Cell reports, vol. 15, no. 12, pp. 2809-2824, doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.05.047.

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Title Dietary fiber and bacterial SCFA enhance oral tolerance and protect against food allergy through diverse cellular pathways
Author(s) Tan, Jian
McKenzie, Craig
Vuillermin, Peter J.
Goverse, Gera
Vinuesa, Carola G.
Mebius, Reina E.
Macia, Laurence
Mackay, Charles
Journal name Cell reports
Volume number 15
Issue number 12
Start page 2809
End page 2824
Total pages 17
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-06-21
ISSN 2211-1247
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Cell Biology
Summary The incidence of food allergies in western countries has increased dramatically in recent decades. Tolerance to food antigens relies on mucosal CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs), which promote differentiation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. We show that high-fiber feeding in mice improved oral tolerance and protected from food allergy. High-fiber feeding reshaped gut microbial ecology and increased the release of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), particularly acetate and butyrate. High-fiber feeding enhanced oral tolerance and protected against food allergy by enhancing retinal dehydrogenase activity in CD103(+) DC. This protection depended on vitamin A in the diet. This feeding regimen also boosted IgA production and enhanced T follicular helper and mucosal germinal center responses. Mice lacking GPR43 or GPR109A, receptors for SCFAs, showed exacerbated food allergy and fewer CD103(+) DCs. Dietary elements, including fiber and vitamin A, therefore regulate numerous protective pathways in the gastrointestinal tract, necessary for immune non-responsiveness to food antigens.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.05.047
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920108 Immune System and Allergy
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085915

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Created: Tue, 06 Sep 2016, 10:59:08 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.