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Infant adiposity at birth and early postnatal weight gain predict increased aortic intima-media thickness at 6 weeks of age: a population-derived cohort study

McCloskey, Kate, Burgner, David, Carlin, John B., Skilton, Michael R., Cheung, Michael, Dwyer, Terence, Vuillermin, Peter and Ponsonby, Anne-Lousie 2016, Infant adiposity at birth and early postnatal weight gain predict increased aortic intima-media thickness at 6 weeks of age: a population-derived cohort study, Clinical science, vol. 130, no. 6, pp. 443-450, doi: 10.1042/CS20150685.

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Title Infant adiposity at birth and early postnatal weight gain predict increased aortic intima-media thickness at 6 weeks of age: a population-derived cohort study
Author(s) McCloskey, Kate
Burgner, David
Carlin, John B.
Skilton, Michael R.
Cheung, Michael
Dwyer, Terence
Vuillermin, Peter
Ponsonby, Anne-Lousie
Journal name Clinical science
Volume number 130
Issue number 6
Start page 443
End page 450
Total pages 8
Publisher Portland Press
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-02-04
ISSN 1470-8736
Keyword(s) aortic IMT
atherosclerosis
developmental origins of disease
macrosomia
postnatal weight gain
Adiposity
Adult
Aorta
Birth Weight
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Pregnancy
Skinfold Thickness
BIS investigator group
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, Research & Experimental
Research & Experimental Medicine
INTRAUTERINE GROWTH RESTRICTION
MATERNAL PROTEIN-INTAKE
ISCHEMIC-HEART-DISEASE
CATCH-UP GROWTH
MACROSOMIC NEWBORNS
METABOLIC SYNDROME
BODY-COMPOSITION
LATER CHILDHOOD
LIPID PROFILE
RISK-FACTORS
Summary Infant body composition and postnatal weight gain have been implicated in the development of adult obesity and cardiovascular disease, but there are limited prospective data regarding the association between infant adiposity, postnatal growth and early cardiovascular parameters. Increased aortic intima-media thickness (aortic IMT) is an intermediate phenotype of early atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between weight and adiposity at birth, postnatal growth and aortic IMT. The Barwon Infant Study (n=1074 mother-infant pairs) is a population-derived birth cohort. Infant weight and other anthropometry were measured at birth and 6 weeks of age. Aortic IMT was measured by trans-abdominal ultrasound at 6 weeks of age (n=835). After adjustment for aortic size and other factors, markers of adiposity including increased birth weight (β=19.9 μm/kg, 95%CI 11.1, 28.6; P<0.001) and birth skinfold thickness (β=6.9 μm/mm, 95%CI 3.3, 10.5; P<0.001) were associated with aortic IMT at 6 weeks. The association between birth skinfold thickness and aortic IMT was independent of birth weight. In addition, greater postnatal weight gain was associated with increased aortic IMT, independent of birth weight and age at time of scan (β=11.3 μm/kg increase, 95%CI 2.2, 20.3; P=0.01). Increased infant weight and adiposity at birth, as well as increased early weight gain, were positively associated with aortic IMT. Excessive accumulation of adiposity during gestation and early infancy may have adverse effects on cardiovascular risk.
Language eng
DOI 10.1042/CS20150685
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30085922

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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