Openly accessible

Perinatal maternal depression and cortisol function in pregnancy and the postpartum period: a systematic literature review

Seth, Sunaina, Lewis, Andrew J and Galbally, Megan 2016, Perinatal maternal depression and cortisol function in pregnancy and the postpartum period: a systematic literature review, BMC pregnancy childbirth, vol. 16, pp. 1-19, doi: 10.1186/s12884-016-0915-y.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
seth-perinatalmaternal-2016.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.09MB 7

Title Perinatal maternal depression and cortisol function in pregnancy and the postpartum period: a systematic literature review
Author(s) Seth, Sunaina
Lewis, Andrew JORCID iD for Lewis, Andrew J orcid.org/0000-0002-2519-7976
Galbally, Megan
Journal name BMC pregnancy childbirth
Volume number 16
Article ID 124
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher Biomed central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-05
ISSN 1471-2393
Keyword(s) Antenatal depression
Baby blues
Cortisol
Maternal blues
Maternal mood
Perinatal depression
Postnatal depression
Postpartum depression
Pregnancy
Steroid hormones
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Obstetrics & Gynecology
CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE
PITUITARY-ADRENAL AXIS
CARDIFF PUERPERAL MOOD
SALIVARY CORTISOL
MENTAL-HEALTH
DOPAMINERGIC TRANSMISSION
PLASMA-CORTISOL
BETA-ENDORPHIN
Summary BACKGROUND: Perinatal depression has a significant impact on both mother and child. However, the influence of hormonal changes during pregnancy and the postpartum period remains unclear. This article provides a systematic review of studies examining the effects of maternal cortisol function on perinatal depression.

METHOD: A systematic search was conducted of six electronic databases for published research on the relationship between cortisol and perinatal depression. The databases included; MEDLINE complete, PsychINFO, SCOPUS, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences, Science Direct and EBSCO, for the years 1960 to May 2015. Risk of bias was assessed and data extraction verified by two investigators.

RESULTS: In total, 47 studies met criteria and studies showed considerable variation in terms of methodology including sample size, cortisol assays, cortisol substrates, sampling processes and outcome measures. Those studies identified as higher quality found that the cortisol awakening response is positively associated with momentary mood states but is blunted in cases of major maternal depression. Furthermore, results indicate that hypercortisolemia is linked to transient depressive states while hypocortisolemia is related to chronic postpartum depression.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Future research should aim to improve the accuracy of cortisol measurement over time, obtain multiple cortisol samples in a day and utilise diagnostic measures of depression. Future studies should also consider both antenatal and postnatal depression and the differential impact of atypical versus melancholic depression on cortisol levels, as this can help to further clarify the relationship between perinatal depression and maternal cortisol function across pregnancy and the postpartum period.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-0915-y
Field of Research 1114 Paediatrics And Reproductive Medicine
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1110 Nursing
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086010

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 17 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 19 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 45 Abstract Views, 7 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 08 Sep 2016, 12:01:16 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.