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Professionals' perceptions regarding the suitability of investigative interview protocols with Aboriginal children

Hamilton, Gemma, Powell, Martine and Brubacher, Sonja 2016, Professionals' perceptions regarding the suitability of investigative interview protocols with Aboriginal children, Australian psychologist, In Press, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1111/ap.12196.

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Title Professionals' perceptions regarding the suitability of investigative interview protocols with Aboriginal children
Author(s) Hamilton, Gemma
Powell, MartineORCID iD for Powell, Martine orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Brubacher, Sonja
Journal name Australian psychologist
Season In Press
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Milton, Qld.
Publication date 2016-06
ISSN 0005-0067
1742-9544
Summary Objective: Despite the heterogeneity of Australian Aboriginal peoples, certain styles of relating are shared and are markedly different to the communication styles of non-Aboriginal peoples. These differences may affect the suitability of current investigative interview protocols to Australian Aboriginal children. This study aimed to qualitatively evaluate the applicability of an investigative interview protocol to Australian Aboriginal children and examine how it could be modified to better suit the communication styles in many Aboriginal communities. Method: A diverse group of 28 participants who had expertise in Aboriginal language and culture, as well as an understanding of the child investigative interview process, each partook in an in-depth semi-structured interview where they were prompted to reflect on Aboriginal language and culture with reference to a current interview protocol (in the context of sexual assault investigation). Results: Thematic analysis revealed overall support for the narrative-based structure of the interview protocol when eliciting information from Aboriginal children. A number of concerns were also identified, and these largely related to the syntax and vocabulary within the protocol, as well as the methods of questioning and building rapport with the child. Conclusions: Directions for future research and potential modifications to investigative interview protocols to better suit Aboriginal children are discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/ap.12196
Field of Research 1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Science
Socio Economic Objective 920399 Indigenous Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Australian Psychological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086012

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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