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Is nine weeks of complex training effective for improving lower body strength, explosive muscle function, sprint and jumping performance?

Talpey, Scott W., Young, Warren B. and Saunders, Natalie 2016, Is nine weeks of complex training effective for improving lower body strength, explosive muscle function, sprint and jumping performance?, International journal of sports science and coaching, vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 736-745, doi: 10.1177/1747954116667112.

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Title Is nine weeks of complex training effective for improving lower body strength, explosive muscle function, sprint and jumping performance?
Author(s) Talpey, Scott W.
Young, Warren B.
Saunders, Natalie
Journal name International journal of sports science and coaching
Volume number 11
Issue number 5
Start page 736
End page 745
Total pages 10
Publisher Sage
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1747-9541
2048-397X
Keyword(s) post-activation
potentiation
power
vertical jump
Social Sciences
Hospitality, Leisure, Sport & Tourism
Psychology, Applied
Social Sciences - Other Topics
Psychology
Post-activation potentiation
Summary There is currently minimal evidence from training studies that document the effectiveness of complex training to elicitgains in explosive muscle function that are greater than those obtained from a more conventional approach. Over nineweeks of training, 20 recreationally trained athletes with a minimum of one year of resistance training experience wererandomly assigned to either a complex training group (n¼9) or a conventional training group (n¼11). In an attempt tocapitalise on muscle’s post-activation potentiation response, the complex training group performed all sets of ½ backsquats prior to sets of jumps squats, while the conventional training group performed jump squats prior to sets of ½ backsquats. Lower body explosive muscle function and jump performance improved significantly in both groups. The complextraining group’s improvement in running vertical jump performance was significantly greater than in the conventionalgroups. Sprint performance was not significantly improved in either training group.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/1747954116667112
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086057

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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